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We found 5 results for Emory School Of Medicine in video

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Awake Steroid Injection for Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis
video

Contributor: Michael Johns III, MD This video demonstrates a steroid injection in an awake patient for the treatment of idiopathic subglottic stenosis. The patient is first anesthetized with topical 2% lidocaine over the larynx and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine percutaneously over the cricoid cartilage. An endoscope is passed transnasally and positioned just below the vocal folds. A 23 gauge needle is then passed through the cricothyroid membrane, and Kenalog is circumferentially injected submucosally taking care not to reduce the caliber size of the airway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/htvmbepobg

Treatment of Adult Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis with CO2 Laser and Balloon Dilation
video

Contributors: Michael M. Johns III and Benjamin Anthony The patient is a 53 year-old female with history of idiopathic subglottic stenosis and long-standing right vocal fold scarring who had previously been treated endoscopically in the operating room and in the office with steroid injections. She returns to the operating room for scheduled endoscopic CO2 laser treatment, Depo-Medrol injection (not shown), balloon dilation, and Mitomycin C application (not shown). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/p7s4gn9n20 Editor Recruited By: Michael M. Johns, III, MD

Transoral Resection of Stylohyoid Ligament
video

Contributors: Raj Dedhia, M.D Eagle’s Syndrome, also known as Styloid Syndrome, is defined by the presence of an elongated, misshapen, or calcified stylohyoid ligament. It is characterized by pain localized to either side of the throat, odynophagia, and referred otalgia. Transoral removal of the stylohyoid ligament consists of transecting the stylohyoid ligament to release tension and result in improvement of pain. DOI #: https://doi.org/10.17797/o3iz10qacz

Expansion Sphincter Pharyngoplasty
video

Contributors: Raj Dedhia, M.D Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder with many possible etiologies. Surgical therapy is aimed at reducing or eliminating an area of airway stenosis that predisposes patients to obstructive sleep apnea. Expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty consists of transecting the palatopharyngeus and reinserting it into the lateral soft palate and periosteum of the pterygoid hamulus to widen the pharyngeal airway. DOI #: https://doi.org/10.17797/i9jgkva8m4

Transoral Incision and Drainage of a Massive Retropharyngeal Abscess Involving the Danger Space
video

Retropharyngeal (RP) abscesses are uncommon yet serious sequala of pediatric head and neck infections. The RP space extends from the skull-base to the carina and is located between the buccopharyngeal fascia, alar fascia, and the carotid sheaths. Immediately deep to this, anterior to the prevertebral fascia, is the “danger space,” allowing infection to spread into the thorax and mediastinum. We present the use of a transoral incision, and suction assisted evacuation for managing a massive RPA with danger space extension. Our patient, a 19 months-old previously healthy female, presented with 10 days of progressive congestion, cough, and fever. Evaluation demonstrated a toxic stridorous child. Chest radiograph demonstrated significant superior mediastinal widening. Subsequent contrasted CT imaging demonstrated a large, rim-enhancing, RP fluid collection extending from the neck to the carina with tracheoesophageal compression and mediastinitis. The patient was taken urgently the OR for drainage. Following bronchoscopy and intubation, a mouth gag was used to expose the RP. Parasagittal incision was made with immediate expression of high volume purulent material. Hemostat dissection was performed to disrupt loculations and extrinsic neck compression was used to evacuate the abscess. To access the deepest components, an eight French tracheal suction catheter was passed to assist with decompression of the mediastinal components until no further material could be evacuated. Copious irrigation was performed and the incision was left open. The patient was kept intubated for 48 hours, before uneventful extubation.

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