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We found 69 results for Head and Neck Surgery in video, leadership, management, webinar & news

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Tension-free thyroidectomy (TFT)
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In this video, we present a new method of tension-free thyroidectomy (TFT). The procedure is based on the medial approach to the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands after the division of isthmus and successive complete dissection of Berry's ligament. The operation was performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Patients were placed in a supine position without neck extension. A 35-40 mm horizontal skin incision was made 1 cm above the sternal notch. Subcutaneous fat and platysma muscle were dissected. The linea alba was incised longitudinally for 4–5 cm. When the isthmus capsule was exposed, the last was divided in the middle. Full mobilization of the isthmus and thyroid lobe from the trachea by dissecting the Berry's ligament was performed. Intermitted neuromonitoring (5 mA, Inomed C2) was used to guide the division of fibers of the Berry's ligament. By using the pinnate the thyroid lobe was retracted into the lateral direction (only lateral traction of the thyroid lobe was used during the operation). The mobilization of the thyroid lobe from the trachea was completed by the division of small branches of the inferior thyroid artery and vein. The main branch of the inferior thyroid artery and vein were preserved along with the vessels supplying the parathyroid glands. After complete separation of the thyroid lobe and inferior thyroid vessels from the trachea the recurrent laryngeal nerve was identified and dissected. Also from the medial side, the upper and lower parathyroid glands and their vessels were identified and fully separated from the thyroid capsule. The lower pole of the lobe was pulled out of the thyroid bed. Finally, after neuromonitoring of the superior laryngeal nerve, the upper pole vessels were dissected and divided. In case a total thyroidectomy the same procedure was performed on the contralateral side after vagus stimulation (V2).

Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Harvest
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This video highlights the surgical nuances of rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap harvest.

Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulator Implantation: 2-Incision Technique
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Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulator Implantation: 2-Incision Technique Authors: Cheryl Yu, MD1; Nilan Vaghjiani, BS1; Ryan Nord, MD1 1Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology/ Head and Neck Surgery, Richmond, VA 

Background: 

Obstructive sleep apnea is a worldwide health problem that affects all groups. Given its systemic associations with comorbid diseases, it ultimately increases lifetime risk of mortality and thus, should not be a disorder taken lightly. Although continuous positive airway pressure is thoroughly acknowledged as the gold standard for treating OSA with studied efficacy, adherence remains challenge. Given such, hypoglossal nerve stimulation therapy presents a revolutionary alternative for those with moderate to severe degrees of OSA who are unable to tolerate standard CPAP therapy. It has been studied to be very efficacious in treating the disorder, with reductions in apneas up to 70-80%. The surgery itself is less invasive, now even more so with the 2-incision technique, when compared to other surgical options such as mandibular advancement or other upper airway surgery, with decreased post-operative pain and healing times. Adherence to therapy is generally superior as the majority prefer it over traditional positive airway pressure therapy.  Overall, hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation is an effective, tolerable long-term alternative treatment option for those with OSA. 

Case Overview: 84-year-old female with BMI of 31 with past medical history significant for hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and obstructive sleep apnea and inability to tolerate CPAP. Polysomnography revealed severe OSA with an AHI of 33 and minimal central or mixed apneas. Preoperative drug induced sleep endoscopy was performed noting complete anterior-posterior collapse of the velum, no collapse at the oropharynx, complete anterior-posterior collapse of the tongue base, and no collapse at the epiglottis. Patient was subsequently deemed an appropriate candidate for hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation and elected to proceed with the procedure. The following video demonstrates her hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation via the 2-incision technique detailing the procedure's anatomic landmarks and corresponding steps.

Minimally Invasive Radioguided Parathyroidectomy
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Minimally Invasive Radioguided Parathyroidectomy Author: Joshua Hagood Performing surgeon/coauthor: Brendan C. Stack, Jr., M.D., FACS, FACE Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA Overview: Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disease caused by overproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH). This condition is most commonly caused by a solitary, hyperfunctioning, adenoma among one of the four parathyroid glands. The hallmark finding of hyperparathyroidism is hypercalcemia which can manifest symptomatically as nephrolithiasis, diabetes insipidus, renal insufficiency, bone pathology, gastrointestinal symptoms, and neuropsychiatric disturbances (remembered as “Stones, Bones, Groans, and Psychiatric overtones”). Minimally invasive Radio guided Parathyroidectomy (MIRP) is a curative procedure for primary hyperparathyroidism that can use both radionuclide guidance and intraoperative PTH measurements to confirm the removal of the offending adenoma. Radionuclide guidance is performed via the injection of 99mTc-sestamibi, which is a radiomarker that sequesters within adenomatous/hypermetabolic parathyroid tissue. Intraoperatively, the amount of 99mTc-sestamibi within excised tissue can be measured with the use of a handheld gamma probe. Instrumentation: -Endotracheal Nerve Integrity Monitoring System (NIMS) -Gamma Probe -Intraoperative PTH assay equipment

Vocal Fold Cordectomy Type I (ELS classification) for Carcinoma In Situ of the Vocal Fold Using Carbon Dioxide Laser
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Authors: Yonatan Lahav, MD, Doron Halperin, MD, Hagit Shoffel-Havakuk, MD. Subepithelial vocal fold cordectomy (Type I cordectomy according to the ELS classification) for Carcinoma In Situ, performed under general anesthesia with direct microlaryngoscopy and suspension using a free beam CO2 Laser. The resection respects the layered structure of the vocal folds and preserves the superficial lamina propria and its vasculature. The video follows the procedure step by step and includes detailed instructions.

Transoral Resection of Stylohyoid Ligament
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Contributors: Raj Dedhia, M.D Eagle’s Syndrome, also known as Styloid Syndrome, is defined by the presence of an elongated, misshapen, or calcified stylohyoid ligament. It is characterized by pain localized to either side of the throat, odynophagia, and referred otalgia. Transoral removal of the stylohyoid ligament consists of transecting the stylohyoid ligament to release tension and result in improvement of pain. DOI #: https://doi.org/10.17797/o3iz10qacz

Mandibular Distraction for Micrognathia in a Neonate
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Introduction Patients with Pierre-Robin Sequence (PRS) suffer from micrognathia, glossoptosis, and upper airway obstruction, which is sometimes associated with cleft palate and feeding issues. To overcome these symptoms in our full-term male neonate patient with PRS, mandibular distraction osteogenesis was performed. Methods The patient was intubated after airway endoscopy. A submandibular incision was carried down to the mandible. A distractor was modified to fit the osteotomy site that we marked, and its pin was pulled through an infrauricular incision. Screws secured the plates and the osteotomy was performed. The mandible was distracted 1.8 mm daily for twelve days. Results During distraction, the patient worked with speech therapy. Eventually, he adequately fed orally. He showed no further glossoptosis or obstruction after distraction was completed. Conclusion In our experience, mandibular distraction is a successful way to avoid a surgical airway and promote oral feeding in children with PRS and obstructive symptoms. By: Ravi W Sun, BE Surgeons: Megan M Gaffey, MD Adam B Johnson, MD, PhD Larry D Hartzell, MD Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR, USA Recruited by: Gresham T Richter, MD

Excision of Macrocystic Lymphatic Malformation
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Introduction Lymphatic malformations (LM) are composed of dilated, abnormal lymphatic vessels classified as macrocystic (single or multiple cysts >2 cm3), microcystic (<2 cm3), or mixed. This patient is a 5-month-old with a right neck mass consistent with macrocystic lymphatic malformation on MRI. This low-flow vascular malformation required surgical intervention. Methods The site was marked in a natural skin crease. Subplatysmal flaps were raised and malformation was immediately encountered. Blunt soft tissue dissection was performed immediately adjacent to the mass to reflect tissue off the fluid-filled lesion. Neurovascular structures were preserved in this process. Mass was removed in total and Penrose drain and neck dressing were placed. Results A complete resection was performed. LM was confirmed on pathology. Patient is doing well with no deficits noted. The drain was removed after 1 week. One-month follow-up showed no recurrence. Conclusion Macrocystic lymphatic malformations are amenable to surgical resection at low risk and without recurrence. By: Ravi W Sun, BE Surgeons: Luke T Small, MD Gresham Richter, MD Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR, USA Recruited by: Gresham T Richter, MD

Total Facial Nerve Decompression via Combined Middle Fossa-Transmastoid Approach
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This video demonstrates total facial nerve decompression via combined Middle Fossa-Transmastoid approach. Gavriel D. Kohlberg, MD,1 Noga Lipschitz, MD,1 Charles B. Poff, BS,2 MD, Ravi N. Samy, MD, FACS1,3 1 Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA 2 College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA 3 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA

Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis with Multivector External Devices
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Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial malformation characterized by micrognathia and glossoptosis, with or without cleft palate. A subset of infants with PRS will suffer from airway obstruction severe enough to merit surgical intervention. Surgeries for PRS include tongue lip adhesion, tracheotomy, gastrostomy, and bilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Distraction osteogenesis refers to a process in which a bone is lengthened after an initial osteotomy by means of separating the two resulting segments slowly over time. In the neonatal mandible, hardware used for distraction may be implanted beneath the skin or affixed externally. Each device has its advantages and disadvantages, however external devices are less expensive, do not typically require preoperative computed tomography scanning, may be adjusted easily throughout the distraction process, and are easily removed following consolidation, avoiding a second invasive procedure and lengthy anesthetic. This video presents the technique of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis using multivector external distractors.

Middle Fossa Approach for Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) Resection
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This video demonstrates the operative setup and surgical steps of a middle fossa approach for the resection of vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Authors: Cameron C. Wick, MD (cameron.wick@wustl.edu) 1 Samuel L. Barnett, MD (sam.barnett@utsouthwestern.edu) 2 J. Walter Kutz Jr., MD (walter.kutz@utsouthwestern.edu) 3 Brandon Isaacson, MD (brandon.isaacson@utsouthwestern.edu) 3 1 - Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 2 - Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 3- Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Excision of Macrocystic Lymphatic Malformation
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This patient is a 9-month-old with a macrocystic lymphatic malformation (LM) of the left neck. LMs, the second most common type of head and neck vascular malformation, are composed of dilated, abnormal lymphatic vessels thought to occur due to abnormal development of the lymphatic system. A complete resection was performed, and LM was confirmed by pathology. Soft tissue dissection was performed immediately adjacent to the mass to reflect tissue off the fluid-filled lesion. Neurovascular structures were preserved in this process.

Use of CO2 Flexible Fiber Laser in Lyses of Middle Ear Adhesions
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This video demonstrates the use of CO2 flexible fiber laser for the lyses of middle ear adhesions in a patient s/p canal wall down mastoidectomy.

Endoscopic Ossiculoplasty (TORP) with Prolapsed Facial Nerve
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This video illustrates an endoscopic ossiculoplasty using a total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP) in a patient with a mixed hearing loss and a large conductive component. The video highlights the middle ear anatomy including a dehiscent and prolapsed facial nerve partially obstructing the oval window. Technical pearls for the ossiculoplasty are also highlighted. Cameron C. Wick, MD Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA cameron.wick@wustl.edu J. Walter Kutz Jr., MD Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA walter.kutz@utsouthwestern.edu

Retroseptal Transconjunctival Approach to Orbital Floor Blowout Fracture
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The transconjunctival approach was first described by Bourquet in 1924 and then modified by Tessier in 1973 for exposure of the orbital floor and maxilla for the treatment of facial trauma. This approach can be carried out either in a preseptal plane by separating the orbital septum from within the eyelid (preseptal approach) or posterior to the septum and eyelid (retroseptal approach) by making an incision through the bulbar conjunctiva directly above the orbital rim. The main advantage of the retroseptal approach is that it does not involve dissection and disruption of the eyelid itself, therefore, reducing the incidence of post-operative lid laxity and position abnormalities. This video will show a retroseptal approach to an orbital floor blowout fracture. A lateral inferior cantholysis is performed to facilitate eversion and retraction of the lower eyelid.

Excision of a Preauricular Cyst
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Background Preauricular cysts are a subset of asymptomatic, dome-shaped lesions referred to as epidermoid cysts. Cysts vary in size and have the ability to grow in diameter over time. These cysts can occur anywhere on the body and usually contain keratin. Upon examination of a suspected cyst, different characteristics can specify its type. Dermoid cysts are typically odorous lesions found around the eyes or on the base of the nose. If the cyst did not originate from sebaceous glands, it is not deemed a sebaceous cyst. Typically, surgical intervention is required to fully remove the cyst and prevent further infections or growth.  Introduction The video shows an 18-year-old female who presented with a preauricular cyst near her left ear. Upon history and physical examination, the mass was predicted to be a dermoid cyst rather than a sebaceous cyst. Surgical recommendations were given to perform an excisional biopsy of the cyst. The excision is displayed step-wise in the video. Methods A 2 cm incision was made just posterior to the lesion with a 15 blade scalpel. Dissection was carried with a sharp hemostat down the level of the parotid fascia. A 1 cm cystic structure was found adherent to the overlying dermis. An elliptical incision was then made over the mass and it was removed with the adherent overlying skin. The wound was then irrigated. Wound was closed in 3 layers. First, the deep layer was closed with 5-0 PDS in interrupted fashion, followed by 5-0 monocryl in running subcuticular fashion, followed by Dermabond Results The patient was returned to the care of anesthesia where she was awoken, extubated, and transported to PACU in stable condition. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged the same day. The specimen was sent for pathological analysis. The pathology report showed that the mass was an epidermal inclusion cyst.

How to Perform Salivary Gland Massage: Instructional Video
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Title: How to perform a salivary gland massage - an instructional video Delaney Sheehan, MS; David Thompson, MS; Brittany Foret, MS; Michael Olejniczak, MS; Rohan R. Walvekar, MD* *Corresponding and Senior Author MS - Medical Student Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, New Orleans, LA 70112 Introduction: Education is a vital component to patient compliance. Salivary gland conditions like sialadenitis, dry mouth and postoperative protocols for sialendoscopy procedures among other procedures on the salivary glands often require a protocol of salivary gland massage; which forms a vital part of salivary gland hygiene i.e. salivary gland massage, hydration and sialogogues. In our search, we did not find a specific educational video demonstrating salivary gland massage. Funding: No external funding. Methods: The Ear Nose and Throat Interest Group at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans under the supervision of senior author compiled the patient education and instructional video. Summary: Educational video on salivary gland massage is a way to disseminate a resource that can be easily accessed by patients and can be helpful in standardizing technique and also compliance.

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Cortical Mastoidectomy & Facial Recess Approach (Part 1 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Description This video covers the key steps of a cortical mastoidectomy and facial recess approach during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. The first part of this video demonstrates a basic cortical mastoidectomy and focuses on fundamental principles including the preservation of the tegmen and sigmoid plate, adequate posterior canal wall thinning, continual saucerization, adequate removal of air cells, and early identification of the lateral semicircular canal and incus. The second part of the video discusses the facial recess approach and enlightens the viewer on the boundaries of the facial recess, the course of the mastoid segment of the facial nerve, and the location of the round window. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: zygomatic root, temporal line, posterior meatal wall, Henle’s spine, mastoid tip, tegmen mastoideum, sigmoid sinus, Koerner’s septum, lateral semicircular canal, incus, incus buttress, chorda tympani nerve, mastoid segment of the facial nerve, facial recess, round window niche, and round window.

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Endolymphatic Sac Dissection (Part 2 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Video Description This video shows the key steps in the dissection of the endolymphatic sac during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. This video builds on part one of our video series and demonstrates fundamentals of endolymphatic surgery including the location and appearance of the endolymphatic sac, and its relationship to the labyrinth. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: sigmoid sinus, mastoid segment of the facial nerve, retrofacial air cells, endolymphatic sac, lateral and posterior semicircular canal, and Donaldson’s line

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Lateral Temporal Bone Resection (Part 3 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Video Description This video covers the key steps of a lateral temporal bone resection during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. This video builds on part two of our video series. This approach allows for the en bloc removal of the external auditory canal and demonstrates fundamental steps of the procedure including: the propagation of a superior trough between the tegmen and the superior aspect of the external auditory canal, the extension of the facial recess inferiorly with sacrifice of the chorda tympani, and the drilling of the hypotympanic bone towards the glenoid. At the completion of the demonstration, the viewer is afforded a labelled view of the medial wall of the mesotympanum, as well as the medial aspect of the external auditory canal with an intact tympanic membrane. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: tegmen, zygomatic root, malleus, incus, stapes, glenoid, eustachian tube, mastoid segment of the facial nerve, chorda tympani nerve, facial recess, hypotympanic space, annular bone, tensor tympani tendon, cochlear promontory, pyramidal process, round window, and lateral semicircular canal.

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Labyrinthectomy (Part 4 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Video Description This video demonstrates the key steps of a labyrinthectomy during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. This video builds on part three of our video series and demonstrates fundamental steps involved in a labyrinthectomy including: the identification of the three-dimensional (3D) orientation of the semicircular canals, the location of the common crus, the relationship between the second genu of the facial nerve and the posterior semicircular canal, the relationship of the vestibule to the endolymphatic sac, the course of the subarcuate artery, and the relationship of the labyrinth to the internal auditory canal. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: posterior semicircular canal, superior semicircular canal, lateral semicircular canal, common crus, external genu of facial nerve, tympanic segment of the facial nerve, tegmen, vestibule, endolymphatic sac, endolymphatic duct, subarcuate artery.

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Internal Auditory Canal Dissection (Part 5 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Video Description This video demonstrates key steps in the dissection of the internal auditory canal during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. This video builds on part four of our video series and demonstrates fundamental steps involved in the dissection of the internal auditory canal including: establishing an inferior trough and identification of the cochlear aqueduct, establishing a superior trough and identification of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, and blue-lining the internal auditory canal from porous to fundus. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: internal auditory canal, cochlear aqueduct, meatal segment of the facial nerve, labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, 1st genu of the facial nerve, tympanic segment of the facial nerve, 2nd genu of the facial nerve, mastoid segment of the facial nerve.

A Guide to Temporal Bone Dissection: Infratemporal Approach (Part 6 of 6)
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Authors Mohamedkazim M. Alwani, MD1, 3 Jon L. Harper, BS1, 3 Rick F. Nelson, MD PhD1, 2, 3 Author Affiliations Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery1 Department of Neurological Surgery2 Indiana University School of Medicine3 Video Description This video demonstrates key steps in the infratemporal approach during lab dissection of the temporal bone. The goal of this video is to serve as a supplementary teaching resource for resident-level surgical trainees by demonstrating key surgical landmarks and proper lab dissection technique. This video builds on part five of our video series and demonstrates fundamental steps of the procedure including: decompression and mobilization of the facial nerve, dissection of the cochlear scalae, skeletonization of the carotid artery, and entry into the jugular bulb. We demonstrate the wide opening of the jugular bulb to facilitate visualization of the medial wall of the jugular bulb, which subsequently aids in the dissection of the pars nervosa. Key surgical landmarks demonstrated in the course of this video include: sigmoid sinus, jugular bulb, mastoid segment of the facial nerve, cochlear scalae, internal carotid artery, pars nervosa

Inferior Turbinate Trim
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Basic Info: A 14-year-old male presented with chronic nasal obstruction and awake stertor. It was discovered that the patient had severe bilateral turbinate hypertrophy. A trial of Flonase and antihistamine was attempted with no improvement. It was recommended that the patient undergo a bilateral nasal turbinate reduction. This procedure is displayed step-wise in the video. Introduction: Chronic nasal obstruction can be caused by inferior turbinate hypertrophy. This video portrays a surgical treatment for turbinate hypertrophy, a turbinate trim with a microdebrider blade. Methods: An Afrin pledget was inserted into each nostril and lidocaine was injected into each inferior turbinate. Each turbinate was medially fractured using a freer. The microdebrider blade was used to trim the inferior 1/3 of each turbinate. A freer was used to out-fracture each inferior turbinate. Afrin pledgets were inserted into each nostril for hemostasis. Results: The inferior one-third of each inferior turbinate was removed via a microdebrider. Patient was sent to recovery in good condition, and Afrin pledgets were removed in recovery once hemostasis was achieved. No adverse reactions were reported by the surgeon or patient. Conclusion: Chronic nasal obstruction can be significantly improved by an inferior turbinate trim and out-fracture. Author: Merit Turner, BS, BS Surgeon: Gresham T. Richter, MD Institutions: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR

Excision of Thyroglossal Duct Cyst (Sistrunk Procedure)
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This video demonstrates an excision of a thyroglossal duct cyst with special focus on 1) using the thyrohyoid membrane as a landmark and 2) dissection of the posterior hyoid space, which is the space between the thyrohyoid membrane and the posterior surface of the hyoid bone. Contributors: John Maddalozzo MD, FAAP, FACS; Monica Herron, MPAS, PA-C; Sarah Maurrasse, MD; Jesse Arseneau (editor) Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) Excision of a Base of Tongue Venolymphatic Malformation in a Pediatric Patient
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This video demonstrates successful Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) excision of a large, midline, base of tongue venolymphatic malformation after pre-operative embolization in a 6-year-old boy.

Zenker's Diverticulotomy
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This video demonstrates a rigid transoral esophagoscopy with endoscopic stapler cricopharyngeus myotomy and diverticulotomy in a patient with Zenker’s Diverticulum.

Right Sided Hemithyroidectomy for Benign Multinodular Goiter
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Author: Joshua Hagood Performing surgeon/coauthor: Brendan C. Stack, Jr., M.D., FACS, FACE Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Reconstruction of Transcribriform Skull Base Defects
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A 51 year-old male presented to an outside otolaryngologist with recurrent facial pain and congestion. He was found to have a left-sided nasal mass. A work-up was performed, complete with biopsy, which was diagnosed as non-intestinal type adenocarcinoma. He underwent resection via the endoscopic endonasal transcribriform approach. In this video publication, we present our preferred method of reconstruction for sinonasal malignancies treated by endoscopic transcribriform resection using a multilayered closure with the following: a subdural DuraGen inlay graft, a fascia lata onlay graft, and an extradural, extracranial onlay pericranial flap via nasionectomy. A lumbar drain was placed at the end of the case for CSF diversion until the fifth postoperative day. Contributors: Paul A. Gardner, MD, Eric W. Wang, MD, Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda, MD, and Carl H. Snyderman, MD, MBA

Supraglottoplasty and Epiglottopexy for Sleep-Variant Laryngomalacia
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Here we present a 6-year-old girl with sleep-variant laryngomalacia treated successfully with endoscopic epiglottopexy and supraglottoplasty. Johanna L. Wickemeyer, MD1 Sarah E. Maurrasse, MD2,3 Douglas R. Johnston, MD, FACS2,3 Dana M. Thompson, MD, MS, FACS2,3 1Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, University of Illinois—Chicago, 1855 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60612 2Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, 225 E. Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 3Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 420 E Superior St, Chicago, IL 60611

Transpalatal Advancement Pharyngoplasty
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The retropalatal airway is a common site of collapse in obstructive sleep apnea. Transpalatal advancement pharyngoplasty aims to address this site of upper airway collapse by advancing the soft palate anteriorly, increasing the cross-sectional area of the airway and decreasing pharyngeal collapsibility. Surgeon: Raj C. Dedhia1, MD, MSCR Video Production: Yifan Liu1,2, MD, Jason Yu1, MD 1 Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania 2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck, Affiliated Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University

Sphenopalatine Artery Ligation
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A 70-year-old male presented with persistent left-sided epistaxis, occurring 4 - 12 times a day for 3 weeks. Episodes lasted 10 - 15 minutes, but once required nasal packing at the ED. Introduction: Ligation of the sphenopalatine artery is often indicated for patients with persistent posterior epistaxis that cannot be attributed to other causes. This video demonstrates a step-wise endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation using hemoclips. Methods: In order to access the maxillary sinus cavity, a ball-tip probe was used to fracture the uncinate and a backbiter was used to remove the uncinate in its entirety. Once in the maxillary sinus, a backbiter was used to remove the tissue anterior to the normal ostium. A straight Tru-Cut was used to remove tissue posterior the natural ostium, taking down the posterior fontanelle. After this was done, a down-biter and a microdebrider blade were used to remove tissue inferior to the natural ostium towards the inferior turbinate. A caudal instrument was used to raise a subperiosteal flap just posterior to the left maxillary sinus posterior wall. Next, dissection from the inferior turbinate up to the top of the maxillary sinus was done from an inferior to superior direction, roughly 1 cm posterior to the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus. The sphenopalatine artery was seen coming out of the sphenopalatine foramen and soft tissue was dissected off this artery. Two hemoclips were placed over the entire artery. Results: The patient was sent to recovery in good condition and no adverse reactions were reported by the surgeon or patient. Surgeons: Alissa Kanaan, MD. Zachary V. Anderson, MD. Institution: Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Superficial Parotidectomy for a First Branchial Cleft Cyst
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This video demonstrates a superficial parotidectomy approach for the excision of a first branchial cleft cyst in a pediatric patient. This particular patient was a 4-year-old girl who presented with intermittent swelling in the region of the left parotid. On MRI, she was found to have a lobular mass consistent with a first branchial cleft cyst. Here we outline the steps of the recommended surgical procedure. Authors: Sarah Maurrasse, MD1,2; Monica Herron, MPAS, PA-C1; John Maddalozzo MD, FAAP, FACS1,2 Editors: Sarah Maurrasse1,2; Jesse Arseneau1 Voiceover: Vidal Maurrasse 1Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago 2Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Endoscopic Frontal Sinusotomy with Osteoma Removal
video

A 49-year-old female presented with a one-year history of right frontal headaches, not controlled despite OTC medication. Work up with head CT revealed an osteoma of the right frontal sinus. The patient experienced no improvement in headache severity and elected to have surgical intervention. Methods: ENT Fusion Navigation system was used during the entire case. A ball-tip probe was used to fracture out the uncinate bone and a backbiter was used to remove the uncinate in its entirety. The natural ostium of the right maxillary sinus was then visualized. Again, the backbiter was used to remove tissue anterior to the natural ostium. A straight Tru-Cut was used to remove the ostium towards the posterior fontanelle. The right middle turbinate was resected in order to gain sufficient access for the resection of the osteoma. In order to remove the right middle turbinate, a turbinate scissors were used to make 3 cuts along the attachment of the middle turbinate and this was pulled down. A down biter was used to open up the maxillary sinus inferiorly. There was no tissue seen in the maxillary sinus. After this was done, an ethmoidectomy was performed by placing a J-curette behind the ethmoid bulla point anteriorly. This ethmoid bulla was removed along with several other anterior ethmoid cells. After this was done, a frontal sinus seeker was used to identify the right frontal osteoma. The patient did not have a right frontal sinus. Instead, an osteoma was in the area of what would have been the right frontal sinus or nasal frontal outflow tract. Image guidance was meticulously used to identify the osteoma. A 70-degree frontal drill was used and this osteoma was slowly drilled to remove as much as possible. Drilling was done from the posterior edge of the osteoma up to the skull base superiorly, to the lamina papyracea laterally and all bone that could be safely removed was removed. A right frontal propel stent was placed in the bony cavity created by the drill out and after this, the sinus was irrigated and suctioned. Results: The patient was sent to recovery in good condition and no adverse reactions were reported by the surgeon or patient. Surgeons: Alissa Kanaan, MD. Zachary V. Anderson, MD. Institution: Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Pediatric Laryngeal Reinnervation with Ansa Cervicalis to Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Anastomosis
video

Unilateral vocal fold paralysis in children has many different etiologies that can result in difficulties with breathing, swallowing, or phonation. Depending on the severity of symptoms, treatment modalities range from non-surgical interventions, to temporary surgical procedures, or more permanent surgical options. Laryngeal reinnervation has been demonstrated as an appropriate treatment option for children with permanent laryngeal nerve damage and persistent symptoms, but it still not widely performed among pediatric otolaryngologists. In this case, we present a 6 year-old female patient who developed unilateral vocal fold paralysis from a cardiac procedure as an infant, and she subsequently underwent laryngeal reinnervation with ansa cervicalis-to-recurrent laryngeal nerve (ANSA-RLN) anastomosis. The patient tolerated the procedure well with no peri-operative complications and demonstrated symptomatic improvement in voice quality and swallowing at her 3 month follow-up appointment. The goal of this case is to demonstrate the steps of the laryngeal reinnervation procedure and acknowledge its importance as a treatment option for unilateral vocal fold paralysis in pediatric patients.




Authors:

Cori N Walker MD1, Christopher Blake Sullivan MD1, Sohit P Kanotra MD1

Department of 1Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA

Open Tracheotomy in Ventilated COVID-19 Patients
video

Authors Carol Li, MD1*, Apoorva T. Ramaswamy, MD1*, Sallie M. Long, MD 1 , Alexander Chern, MD 1 , Sei Chung, MD 1 , Brendon Stiles, MD 2 , Andrew B. Tassler, MD 1 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY *Co-First authors Overview The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global healthcare emergency. The need for prolonged invasive ventilation is common amid this outbreak. Despite initial data suggesting high mortality rates among those requiring intubation, United States data suggests better outcomes for those requiring invasive ventilation. Thus, many of these patients requiring prolonged ventilation have become candidates for tracheotomy. Considered aerosol generating procedures (AGP), tracheotomies performed on COVID-19 patients theoretically put health care workers at high risk for contracting the virus. In this video, we present our institution’s multidisciplinary team-based methodology for the safe performance of tracheotomies on COVID-19 patients. During the month of April 2020, 32 tracheotomies were performed in this manner with no documented cases of COVID-19 transmission with nasopharyngeal swab and antibody testing among the surgical and anesthesia team. Procedure Details The patient is positioned with a shoulder roll to place the neck in extension. The neck is prepped and draped in a sterile fashion with a clear plastic drape across the jawline extending superiorly to cover the head. An institutional timeout is performed. The patient is pre-oxygenated on 100% FiO2. A 2-cm vertical incision is made extending inferiorly from the lower border of the palpated cricoid cartilage. Subcutaneous tissues and strap muscles are divided in the midline. When the thyroid isthmus is encountered, it is either retracted out of the field or divided using electrocautery. The remaining fascia is then cleared off the anterior face of the trachea. Prior to airway entry, the anesthesiologist pauses all ventilation and turns off oxygen flow. The endotracheal tube (ETT) is advanced distally past the planned tracheotomy incision, without deflating the cuff, if possible. If necessary, the endotracheal cuff is deflated partially to advance the tube, with immediate reinflation once in position. The surgical team then creates a tracheotomy using cold steel instruments. The cricoid hook is placed in the tracheotomy incision and retracted superiorly for exposure of the lumen. The tube is withdrawn under direct visual guidance, without deflating the endotracheal cuff if possible. The tracheotomy tube is placed, and to minimize aerosolization of respiratory secretions, the cuff is inflated prior to re-initiation of ventilation. The tracheotomy tube is then sewn to the skin using 2-0 prolene suture. A total of five simple stitches are placed around the tube to prevent accidental decannulation. Indications/Contraindications Candidacy for tracheotomy was determined on a case by case basis with consideration for progression of ventilator weaning, viral load, and overall prognosis. All patients who underwent tracheotomy were intubated prior to the surgery for a minimum of 14 days, able to tolerate a 90-second period of apnea without significant desaturation or hemodynamic instability, and expected to recover. Optimal ventilator settings included FiO2

Radial Free Flap Dissection
video

Institution: University of Cincinnati Medical Center Authors: Yash Patil MD- patilyj@ucmail.uc.edu Arvind Badhey MD- badheyad@ucmail.uc.edu Siddhant Tripathi- tripatst@mail.uc.edu

Fibula Free Flap Harvest
video

We present the harvest of a osteocutaneous fibula free flap for head and neck reconstruction performed at the University of Cincinnati. This reconstructive technique has a wide variety of implications but has found greatest utility in the reconstruction of mandibular defects.

Flex Robotic-Assisted Branchial Cleft Excision via Retroauricular Approach
video

Contributors: Umamaheswar Duvvuri An 18-year-old African American female with a large, type II branchial cleft cyst and a history of keloid scars presented for removal of branchial cleft cyst. We present the first robotic-assisted excision of branchial cleft cyst using the new Flex Robotic© Surgery System.

Flexible Laryngoscopy - An Overview
video

Authors Adam Karkoutli1 Wayne Wortmann1 Rohan R. Walvekar, MD2 Nathan C. Grohmann, MD2 Author Affiliations LSUHSC School of Medicine1 LSUHSC Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery2 Video Description This video demonstrates the procedure for use of firberoptic flexible laryngoscopy. The preoperative steps and recommendations for use of flexible laryngoscopy are outlined. Followed by a visual demonstration of insertion of the laryngoscope along with outlining pertinent landmarks encountered during this procedure.

Branchial Cleft Cyst Excision
video

Branchial cleft cysts are a benign anomaly caused by incomplete obliteration of a primordial branchial cleft.  They typically appear in childhood or adolescence, but can appear at any age. They present as a non-tender, fluctuant mass following an upper respiratory infection, most commonly at the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. These lesions are thought to originate during the 4th week of gestation when the branchial arches fail to fuse. The second branchial cleft is the most common site (95%) and cysts from in this distribution can affect cranial nerves VII, IX, and XII. 

leadership (5)

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Dov Goldenberg, MD
leadership

University of Sao Paulo Medical School
  • Coordinator of Pediatric Plastic Surgery
  • Supervisor (Residency Program in Plastic Surgery at the Division of Plastic Surgery), Hospital das Clinicas – University of Sao Paulo Medical School
  • Attending Cranio-facial Surgeon – Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Otorhiolaryngology, Hospital A.C. Camargo
  • Senior Surgeon and head of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery Team, Hospital Albert Einstein
  • Chief of Pediatric Plastic Surgery Group, Hospital Municipal Infantil Menino Jesus

Residing in São Paulo, Brazil, Dr. Goldenberg graduated from the University of São Paulo Medical School. He then continued his studies with Postdoctoral Training and completed the Residency Program in General Surgery, followed by the Residency Program in Plastic Surgery at the Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

Soon thereafter, Dr. Goldenberg earned his PhD in Plastic Surgery at the University of São Paulo Medical School, where he also gained his title as Full Professor of the Department of Surgery.

Dr. Goldenberg is the Editor-In-Chief for the Brazilian Journal of Plastic, International Associate Editor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Journal (PRS), and past President of the Brazilian Association of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery.

His areas of interest in plastic surgery include Pediatric Plastic Surgery, Cranio-facial Surgery and Vascular Anomalies.

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Adam Zanation, MD
leadership

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Director, Head and Neck Robotic Surgery Program
  • Director of the Advanced Head and Neck Oncology, Skull Base, and Rhinology Fellowships
  • Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Dr. Adam Mikial Zanation is a tenure tract Associate Professor within the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also the Director of the Head and Neck Robotic Surgery Program and the Director of the Advanced Head and Neck Oncology, Skull Base, and Rhinology Fellowships. He was born on July 11, 1976, in Concord, North Carolina and attended the University of North Carolina where he was a three-year graduate with honors and research commendation in 1997. He then matriculated to the University of North Carolina School of Medicine where he graduated 1of 4 students in his class with highest honors. Following residency, Dr. Zanation completed a Cranial Base Surgical Oncology Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Zanation’s clinical practices focus on cranial base surgery, specifically employing endoscopic and minimally invasive approaches to complex tumor locations. His clinical research focuses on quality of life, neurofunctional, and neurocognitive outcomes, as well as application of new surgical technology such as robotic surgery to reduce patient morbidity. Dr. Zanation’s translational basic research interests focuses on genomic analyses of head and neck tumors and thyroid cancers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Dr. Zanation currently has 70 PubMed Indexed publications and in the last five years has presented at over 60 national and international meetings. Dr. Zanation is married to Jennifer Stegall Zanation who is a Neonatal ICU Pharmacist at UNC Hospitals. They have two young children and enjoy a multitude of outdoor activities.

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Ehab Hanna, MD, FACS
leadership

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Professor and Vice Chair
  • Department of Head and Neck Surgery

Ehab Hanna, M.D., FACS, is an internationally recognized head and neck surgeon and expert in the treatment of patients with skull base tumors and head and neck cancer. He is Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Head and Neck Surgery at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. After earning his medical degree, he completed a surgery internship at Vanderbilt University, and residency in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. He received advanced fellowship training in skull base surgery and head and neck surgical oncology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He joined the MD Anderson faculty in 2004 with a joint appointment at Baylor College of Medicine. He is the medical director of the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Center and co- director of the Skull Base Tumor program at MD Anderson. Dr. Hanna recently served as President of the North American Skull Base Society (NASBS) which was founded in 1989, and is a professional medical society that facilitates communication worldwide between individuals pursuing clinical and research excellence in skull base surgery. Dr. Hanna is leading the development of minimally invasive and robotic applications in skull base surgery. He has consistently been named one of America’s Top Doctors by the Castle Connolly Guide. In addition to patient care, Dr. Hanna is actively engaged in clinical and translational research with emphasis on skull base tumors. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal of Head & Neck, which is the official journal of the International Federation of Head and Neck Societies. He also co-edited a text book on “Comprehensive Management of Skull Base Tumors”.

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Harold C. Pillsbury, III, MD, FACS
leadership

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Chair, University of North Carolina Department of Otolaryngology
  • Thomas J. Dark Distinguished Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery

Harold C. Pillsbury, III, M.D., F.A.C.S., is the Chair of the UNC Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, as well as the Thomas J. Dark Distinguished Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery.

A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Dr. Pillsbury earned his B.A. and M.D. degrees from George Washington University in Washington, DC (1970 and 1972, respectively). He completed his residency training in Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in 1976. Following six years at the Yale University School of Medicine, he joined the UNC faculty in 1982 as an Associate Professor. He served as Chief of the Division of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery from 1983 to 2001.

Dr. Pillsbury has completed an eighteen year term on the American Board of Otolaryngology where he served as Exam Chair and President. He is also past President of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The American Laryngological Association, The Society of University Otolaryngologists, and the Triological Society. He is also past CME coordinator and Vice-President of the Southern Section Triological Society. He is the past President of the American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy.

Dr. Pillsbury has written and/or contributed to over 270 publications and over 45 textbooks. He has also given over 326 presentations nationally and internationally. He has been the primary investigator or co-investigator on over 21 grants. His special field of interest is neurotology and, most especially, cochlear implantation.

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Umamaheswar Duvvuri, MD, PhD
leadership

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Director of Robotic Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery
  • Director of the Center for Advanced Robotics Training (CART)
  • University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Umamaheswar Duvvuri, MD, PhD, is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania obtaining his Medical Degree in 2000 and his PhD in Biophysics in 2002. He completed an internship in General Surgery in 2003 and residency training in Otolaryngology in 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He completed fellowship training in Head and Neck Surgery in 2008 at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

He joined the University of Pittsburgh in August 2008 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Division and is also a staff physician in the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System.

He serves as the Director of Robotic Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, at the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine and is the current Director of the Center for Advanced Robotics Training (CART) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He directs the Cart Training Courses which provide technical and circumstantial resources to initiate and optimize robotic surgery programs.

He has authored numerous research publications and book chapters and is an invited guest lecturer/speaker on the subject of robotic surgery both nationally and internationally.

A Fulbright scholar, his research interests include minimally invasive endoscopic and robotic surgery of the head and neck, tumors of the thyroid and parathyroid glands and molecular oncology of head and neck cancer.

He directs a federally funded laboratory that studies the biology of head and neck cancer. He holds funding from the National Institute of Health, Department of Veterans Affairs and the “V” foundation.

management (3)

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Arlen Meyers, M.D., MBA
management

  • Professor of Otolaryngology, Dentistry, & Engineering (Emeritus), University of Colorado
  • Biomedical Entrepreneurship (Faculty), University of Colorado Denver Graduate School
  • President & CEO, SoPE
  • Chief Medical Officer, Bridge Health
  • Chief Medical Officer, Cliexa
  • Chairman of the Board, GlobalMindED

Dr. Meyers is a retired professor of otolaryngology, dentistry, and engineering at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical campus and President and CEO of SoPE. He has founded several medical device companies and is also the cofounder of a medical tourism company. His primary research centers around biomedical and health innovation and entrepreneurship and life science technology commercialization.

A devoted and prolific member of the SoPE community, Dr. Meyers also leads the Colorado Chapter of SoPE.

Dr. Meyers is a consultant for and speaks to companies, governments, colleges and universities around the world who need his expertise and contacts in the areas of bioentrepreneurship, bioscience, healthcare, healthcare IT, medical tourism — nationally and internationally, new product development, product design, and financing new ventures.

He is a former Harvard-Macy fellow and in 2010, he completed a Fulbright at Kings Business, the commercialization office of technology transfer at Kings College in London. Some of his publications include “Building the Case for Biotechnology.” “Optical Detection of Cancer”, and ” The Life Science Innovation Roadmap”. In addition, he is a faculty member at the University of Colorado Denver Graduate School where he teaches Biomedical Entrepreneurship and is an iCorps participant, trainer and industry mentor.

Dr. Meyers serves as the Chief Medical Officer at Bridge Health and Cliexa, as well as Chairman of the Board at GlobalMindED, a non-profit at risk student success network.  He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Commercial Biotechnology and Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship and Editor-in-Chief of Medscape Reference: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Dr. Meyers is honored to be named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 50 Most Influential Physician Executives of 2011 and nominated in 2012, and Best Doctors 2013.

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Deanne King, M.D., Ph.D.
management

  • Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Director of Clinical Research, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

King has a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry from the Texas A&M University in College Station. She has an M.D./Ph.D. in molecular and cellular biology and pathobiology from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. She completed an internship in general surgery and a surgery residency in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, both at UAMS.

King said she enjoys helping researchers make connections.

“Research can sometimes be an isolating pursuit, but collaboration and idea-sharing is so important to the overall process,” King said. “I’m also looking forward to helping our students and residents. Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery is a highly competitive field. Having published research to your name early in your career is not only a valuable experience, but, increasingly, a necessity for medical students to successfully match into an otolaryngology residency.”

Faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery are fellowship-trained in their specialty and cover all the sub-specialties in the field (otology, endocrine, head and neck, rhinology, laryngology, pediatric and vascular anomalies). The faculty consistently receive high scores on patient satisfaction, and six faculty are listed in “Best Doctors in America.” They practice at UAMS Medical Center, Arkansas Children’s Hospital and the Central Arkansas Veterans Health Care System.

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Gerald B. Healy, M.D., FACS, FRCSI, FRCS
management

  • Professor of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Past President, American College of Surgeons
  • The Healy Chair in Otolaryngology (Emeritus)
  • Otolaryngologist-in-Chief (Emeritus), Children’s Hospital, Boston
  • Surgeon-in-chief (Emeritus), Children’s Hospital, Boston

Gerald B. Healy, M.D., was born in Boston, Massachusetts and received his undergraduate degree with honors from Boston College in 1963 and his M.D. degree from Boston University in 1967. He is the emeritus Surgeon-in-Chief and the emeritus Gerald B. Healy Chair in Otolaryngology at Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Healy is Professor of Otology and Laryngology at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Healy is a member of numerous honorary societies, including the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American College of Surgeons, the Triological Society, the American Laryngological Association, the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology and the American Society of Head and Neck Surgery. He has served as President of the Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons, the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology, the American Bronchoesopagological Association, and the Triological Society (the leading academic society in the specialty of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery). He has served as Secretary and President of the American Laryngological Association. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland and the Royal College of Surgeons of England. He has served as a Chairman of the Board of Regents of the American College of Surgeons and is a past-President of the College. He was the first Otolaryngologist to be elected President. Presently Dr. Healy is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

In 1986, Dr. Healy was elected to the Board of Directors of the American Board of Otolaryngology and served as its Executive Vice-President until 2004. He has also served as a Director of the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He served as a member of the Board of Registration in Medicine in Massachusetts through 2014.

Dr. Healy served as a former Trustee of the Boston Children’s Hospital and Boystown in Omaha, Nebraska.

An active scholar and lecturer, Dr. Healy is the author of several books and book chapters and/or monographs, and is extensively published in peer-reviewed journals. He has been the principal investigator of NIH funded research addressing diseases affecting infants and children and has been cited for his pioneering work with laser surgery in children. In addition he has lectured in North America, Asia and Europe on health care reform, patient safety, the need to restructure medical education and international medical collaboration.

webinar (13)

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Pediatric Cricotracheal Resection: A Step by Step Surgical Presentation
webinar

This talk will focus on the surgical principals of resective airway surgeries with a step by step discussion on the surgical technique of Pediatric Cricotracheal resection.


Sohit Paul Kanotra , MD

Director, Complex Pediatric Airway Program / Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery & Pediatrics
University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics

Dr. Sohit Kanotra is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the Department of Pediatrics at the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine at University of Iowa and the Director of the Complex Pediatric Airway program at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. He has clinical expertise in the management of children with complex airway disorders including open airway reconstructive surgeries. He also has clinical interest in the management of Head and Neck vascular anomalies, pediatric thyroid disorders, minimally invasive endoscopic ear surgery and robotic airway surgery. Dr. Kanotra joined University of Iowa in 2019 prior to which he was the Director of the Pediatric Aerodigestive Center and the surgical director of the vascular anomalies’ clinic at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans in Louisiana.

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Overview of Keratosis Obturans
webinar

Attendees will learn more about Keratosis Obturans and common complications that arise during the procedure. Panelists will answer audience questions during the presentation.


Sreeshyla Basavaraj MBBS, DLO, FRCS (ORL)

Consultant ENT Surgeon
St. Mary's Hopsital, IOW

Dr. Basavaraj was accredited by the Specialist Advisory Committee in Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery and has been awarded his Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training by the Specialist Training Authority of the Surgical Royal Colleges in 2009. After completion of his higher surgical training in Ear Nose Throat & Head Neck surgery in Liverpool, he worked as a Locum Consultant at Queen Alexandra hospital, Portsmouth. He was trained in all sub-specialities of ENT Head and Neck surgery with a sub-speciality interest in Otology. He, along with his other two colleagues, provides 24/7 ENT service for the Island population.

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Advanced Salivary Endoscopy: Challenging Cases Diagnosis & Treatment
webinar

The advanced course will assume a basic understanding of the procedure. It will include complex interventions including endoscopic and combined open (transoral and external procedures), complications and management of complications, approach to revision surgery, in-office procedures, advanced radiology, and will include case studies.

Meet the Course Directors!

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD

Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery

University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, earned his doctoral degree from the University of Mumbai. After graduating in 1998, he completed a residency in Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery at the TN Medical College & BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, India, with triple honors. Subsequently, he completed two head neck surgery fellowships, and trained at at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, which is India's most prestigious cancer institute. After completing an Advanced Head Neck Oncologic Surgery fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, he became an Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center, prior to joining the LSU Health Sciences Center in July 2008. His clinical interests are head neck surgery and salivary endoscopy. His research interests include evaluating prognostic markers and clinical outcomes of head and neck cancer therapy and treatment of salivary gland disorders.


Barry M Schaitkin, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology

UPMC Pittsburgh

Dr. Schaitkin specializes in the treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic conditions of the salivary glands. He practices at UPMC in the Department of Otolaryngology and is affiliated with UPMC branches all across the city of Pittsburgh. He completed his medical degree and residency at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.


Meet the Presenters!


Jolie Chang, MD

Associate Professor, Chief of Sleep Surgery and General Otolaryngology

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Chang specializes in sleep apnea surgery and minimally invasive approaches to the salivary duct with sialendoscopy. She has interest in studying patient reported outcomes after sialendoscopy procedures.


Mark Marzouk, MD

Clinical Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SUNY Upstate Medical University

Dr. Marzouk completed his residency training in 2010 from the UPMC Department of Otolaryngology. He is currently the Division Chief of Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery in Syracuse. He is also the Associate Program Director of Residency Programs.


David W. Eisele, MD. FACS

Andelot Professor and Director - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Eisele is the Past-President of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery and a member of the NCCN Head and Neck Cancer Panel. He has served as a member of the Residency Review Committee for Otolaryngology, as Chair of the Advisory Council for Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery for the American College of Surgeons, President of the American Head and Neck Society, and as Vice-President of the Triological Society. He served as President of the Maryland Society of Otolaryngology and is a former Governor of the American College of Surgeons.


M. Boyd Gillespie, MD, MSc, FACS

Professor and Chair

UTHSC Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

M. Boyd Gillespie is Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he a completed residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Dr. Gillespie earned a Masters in Clinical Research at the Medical University of South Carolina, and is board certified in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Sleep Medicine. He has published over 150 academic papers and is editor of the textbook Gland-Preserving Salivary Surgery: A Problem-Based Approach. He is a former Director of the American Board of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (ABOHNS) and current member of the otolaryngology section of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).


M. Allison Ogden, MD FACS

Professor & Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations - Department of Otolaryngology

Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Ogden is a Professor and Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University School of Medicine. She graduated from the Washington University School of Medicine in 2002 and went on to complete her residency there as well in Otolaryngology in 2007. Her clinical interests include sialendoscopy, nasal obstructions, and hearling loss. In 2015 Dr. Ogden was listed in "Best Doctors in America", an honor that continues to this day.


Arjun S. Joshi, MD

Professor of Surgery

The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences

Arjun Joshi, MD is board-certified in Otolaryngology and Head & Neck surgery by both the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Joshi received his medical degree from the State University of New York at Syracuse and completed his residency at The George Washington University Medical Center. His areas of expertise include: Head and Neck Cancer, Head and Neck Masses, Head and Neck Reconstruction, Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, and Salivary Endoscopy.


Henry T. Hoffman, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology / Professor of Radiation Oncology

University of Iowa Healthcare

Dr. Henry T. Hoffman is an ENT-otolaryngologist in Iowa City, Iowa and is affiliated with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He received his medical degree from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.


David M. Cognetti, MD, FACS

Professor and Chair of Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Cognetti received his BS in Biology from Georgetown University and his MD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University before completing a fellowship in Advanced Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  Dr. Cognetti returned to Jefferson, his professional home, as faculty in 2008.


Christopher H. Rassekh, MD, FACS

Professor in Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery / Director of Penn Medicine Sialendoscopy Program

University of Pennsylvania

Christopher H. Rassekh, MD is Professor of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Penn Medicine. He is the Director of the Penn Medicine Sialendoscopy Program, which provides evaluation of and minimally invasive surgery for diseases that cause swelling of the salivary glands including obstructive diseases such as salivary stones, salivary duct strictures and tumors. Dr. Rassekh sees patients with head and neck tumors including cancers of the mouth, throat, voice box, salivary gland, thyroid and neck and also was a very early adopter of Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) for tumors and salivary gland diseases, and is an expert in cranial base surgery. He also is co-chair of the Airway Safety Committee at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.


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Cleft Lip Revision: Tips and Tricks
webinar

Attendees will learn various tips and tricks to a successful cleft lip revision procedure. There will be a Q&A session to address common challenges and how to address them.

Course Directors

Larry Hartzell, MD FAAP is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is the Director of the Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship. Dr Hartzell also has been the Cleft Team Director in Arkansas since 2012. He is passionate about international humanitarian mission work and dedicates much of his research efforts to cleft surgical and clinical care as well as velopharyngeal insufficiency. Dr Hartzell is actively involved in multiple academic societies and organizations including the AAO-HNS and ACPA.

Dr. Goudy is a professor at Emory University School of Medicine and the director of the division of otolaryngology at Children’s Healthcare in Atlanta. Dr. Goudy’s clinical job involves repair of craniofacial malformations including cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence, and he also participates in head and neck tumor resection and reconstruction.

Panelists

Lauren K. Leeper, MD, FACS
Ashley E. Manlove DMD, MD, FACS

Dr. Leeper completed her residency training in Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery at the Medical University of South Carolina in 2012 and fellowship training in Pediatric Otolaryngology at Arkansas Children's Hospital in 2014.  She returned to the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill in 2014 on faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.  She is the current Fellowship Director and Medical Director of the Children's Cochlear Implant Center.  She is married to Bradley and they have one daughter Sutton and a baby boy arriving this month.

Dr. Manlove joined Carle Foundation Hospital in 2016 as a fellowship trained cleft and craniomaxillofacial surgeon. She is the director of the cleft and craniofacial team at Carle. In 2018 she was name “Rising Star Physician” and that same year she also became the residency program director. Outside of work, she loves spending time with her family and she is an avid runner.

Deborah S. F. Kacmarynski, MD, MS
Jordan Swanson, MD, MSc

Dr. Kacmarynski is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at the University of Iowa, working as a pediatric otolaryngologist and a cleft and craniofacial surgeon with co-directorship for the cleft and craniofacial team at the University of Iowa. Research focus is on biomedical collaborations with oral cleft and craniofacial surgical problems including craniofacial airway, tissue engineering solution development, outcomes research and patient-centered outcomes research collaboratives. I am excited about the long-term impacts of research leading very directly to significant improvements in our patients’ healing and growth.

Jordan Swanson, MD, MSc, is an attending surgeon in the Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Oral Surgery at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with special clinical expertise in cleft, craniofacial, and pediatric plastic surgery. He holds the Linton A. Whitaker Endowed Chair in Plastic, Reconstructive and Oral Surgery.

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Alveolar Bone Graft Surgery: Tips and Tricks
webinar

This webinar will focus on the surgical management of alveolar clefts with bone grafting and fistula closure. Our panel of experts will share various techniques and graft source materials including tips and tricks learned along the way. Our guest moderator will lead a panel discussion at the end of the session to discuss some of the controversies and key points in alveolar grafting.

Dr. Larry Hartzell
Director of Cleft Lip and Palate / Pediatric ENT Surgeon @ Arkansas Children's Hospital / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Dr. Steven Goudy
Professor / Director of Division of Otolaryngology @ Emory University School of Medicine / Children's Healthcare in Atlanta
Larry Hartzell, MD FAAP is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is the Director of the Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship. Dr Hartzell also has been the Cleft Team Director in Arkansas since 2012. He is passionate about international humanitarian mission work and dedicates much of his research efforts to cleft surgical and clinical care as well as velopharyngeal insufficiency. Dr Hartzell is actively involved in multiple academic societies and organizations including the AAO-HNS and ACPA.Dr. Goudy is a professor at Emory University School of Medicine and the director of the division of otolaryngology at Children’s Healthcare in Atlanta. Dr. Goudy’s clinical job involves repair of craniofacial malformations including cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence, and he also participates in head and neck tumor resection and reconstruction.
Travis T. Tollefson MD MPH FACS
Professor & Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
@ University of California Davis
Mark E. Engelstad DDS, MD, MHI
Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ Oregon Health & Science University
Dr. Tollefson is a Professor and Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at the University of California Davis, where he specializes in cleft and pediatric craniofacial care, facial reconstruction and facial trauma care. His interest in the emerging field of Global Surgery and improving surgical access in low-resource countries led him to complete an MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health. He helps lead the CMF arm of the AO-Alliance.org, whose goal is to instill AO principles in facial injuries in low resource settings. His current research focuses on clinical outcomes of patients with cleft lip-palate, facial trauma education in Africa, patterns of mandible fracture care, and patient reported outcomes in facial paralysis surgeries. He serves on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, American Academy of Facial Plastic Surgery, and is the Editor-In-Chief for Facial Plastic Surgery and Aesthetic Medicine journal.Mark Engelstad is Associate Professor and Program Director of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon. His clinical practice focuses on the correction of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities, especially orthognathic surgery and alveolar bone grafting.
John K. Jones, MD, DMD
Associate Professor in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’ Hospital
David Joey Chang, DMD, FACS
Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ Tufts University/Tufts Medical Center
Dr. Jones has over 30 years of experience in the surgical management of cleft lip and palate with particular experience in the area of alveolar ridge grafting and corrective jaw surgery. He has been a member of the Cleft Lip and Palate Team at Arkansas Children’s Hospital for the last six years. During that time he has worked with Dr. Hartzell and his team to introduce and innovate new techniques, many from the realm of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dentistry, in the interest of improving outcomes for this most challenging patient population.Dr. Chang is an associate professor at Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center. Dr. Chang is involved in the Cleft Team at Tufts Medical center since 2012. He also focuses on advanced bone grafting procedures, TMJ surgery, and nerve reconstruction.

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Transnasal Esophageal Dilation from the OR to the Office
webinar

Brought to us by our colleagues at Cook Medical, please join us as we hear from Dr. Gregory Postma, Professor and Vice Chair Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Medical College of Georgia Augusta University, and Dr. Rebecca Howell, Director of the Swallowing Center, UC Health, as they discuss and share some best practices on the transition of transnasal esophageal dilation, from the OR to the office. Please note that certain Cook Medical products, such as the Hercules® 100 Transnasal Esophageal Balloon discussed in this webinar are only available for use in the United States.

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Dr. Robert Ossoff
webinar

Join us in the journey of the legend as he gives us insights into his life and his achievements. Join us to be inspired by one of the best physicians in his field.

Most known for being the first Maness Professor and chair of Otolaryngology and for his role in founding the Vanderbilt Voice Center in 1991, Dr. Ossoff has held an array of positions since he joined Vanderbilt’s faculty in July 1986, including the first director for the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, associate vice chancellor for Health Affairs, chief of staff for Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital, assistant vice chancellor of Compliance and Corporate Integrity and executive medical director for the Vanderbilt Voice Center. He was also highly involved with the creation of the Free Electron Laser Center at Vanderbilt University, bringing with him knowledge he gained during his residency and faculty appointment at Northwestern University in Chicago.

Dr. Ossoff will be joined by Dr. Michael Johns, Director, USC Voice Center, Dr, Albert Merati, Chief of Laryngology, UW Medicine’s Head and Neck Surgery Center, and Dr. Gaelyn Garrett, Professor and Vice-Chair, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Battle of the Medialization Techniques: Michael “Type 1 Thyroplasty” Johns vs. Julina “Reinnervation” Ongkasuwan
webinar

In the next installation of CSurgeries’ series on laryngology, join this interactive webinar with Dr. Julina Ongkasuwan, associate professor of adult and pediatric laryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. Michael Johns, Director, USC Voice Center and Professor, Caruso Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery – University of Southern California, for a discussion of permanent medialization techniques. Type 1 thyroplasty vs Reinnervation.

Which one will you choose and when?

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Current Techniques, Pearls and Strategies for Cochlear Implantation
webinar

In the second installation of CSurgeries’ series in otology, join this interactive webinar with Dr. Sharon Cushing, paediatric otolaryngologist at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, and an Associate Professor and Clinician Investigator in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Toronto, Dr. Samantha Anne, faculty member and otolaryngologist at the Cleveland Clinic, and Dr. Rodrigo C. Silva, Director, Ear and Hearing Center, Texas Children’s Hospital and Associate Professor, Baylor College of Medicine. This panel of experts will discuss how Cochlear implantation (CI) has evolved into the standard of care for the rehabilitation of children with significant hearing loss. These faculty members will discuss videos showcasing the most current techniques for CI in children, as well as pearls and strategies to avoid complications.

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The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly: Awake Vocal Fold Injections
webinar

In the first installation of CSurgeries’ series on laryngology, join this interactive webinar with Dr. Julina Ongkasuwan, associate professor of adult and pediatric laryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. Vyvy Young, associate professor and the associate residency program director of otolaryngology-head and neck Surgery at the University of California – San Francisco, as they walk us through a videos on an awake vocal fold injection procedure. Drs Ongkasuwan and Young will share this video and will provide detailed commentary on their approach.

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Cleft Primary and Revision Rhinoplasty: Tips and Tricks
webinar

Tune in for the latest in our series on Cleft Surgery featuring Dr. Raj Vyas from UC Irvine and Dr. Usama Hamdan with the Global Smile Foundation. The discussion will focus on making sure that attendees know proper procedures as well as common complications and how to avoid them.


Dr. Larry Hartzell

Larry Hartzell, MD FAAP is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is the Director of the Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship. Dr Hartzell also has been the Cleft Team Director in Arkansas since 2012. He is passionate about international humanitarian mission work and dedicates much of his research efforts to cleft surgical and clinical care as well as velopharyngeal insufficiency. Dr Hartzell is actively involved in multiple academic societies and organizations including the AAO-HNS and ACPA.

Steven Goudy MD, MBA, FACS

Dr. Goudy is a professor at Emory University School of Medicine and the director of the division of otolaryngology at Children’s Healthcare in Atlanta. Dr. Goudy’s clinical job involves repair of craniofacial malformations including cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence, and he also participates in head and neck tumor resection and reconstruction.

Usama S. Hamdan, MD, FICS

Dr. Hamdan is President and Co-Founder of Global Smile Foundation, a 501C3 Boston-based non-profit foundation that provides comprehensive and integrated pro bono cleft care for underserved patients throughout the world. He has been involved with outreach cleft programs for over three decades. Dr. Hamdan is an Otolaryngologist/Facial Plastic Surgeon with former university appointments at Harvard Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Medicine. For his philanthropic service to the people of Ecuador, he was awarded the Knighthood, “Al Merito Atahualpa” En El Grado De Caballero, by the President of Ecuador in March 2005. He received Honorary Professorship at Universidad de Especialidades Espíritu Santo, School of Medicine, in Ecuador on March 5, 2015 for his contributions in the field of Cleft Lip and Palate.

Raj M. Vyas, MD, FACS

Dr. Vyas obtained his BS from Stanford and his MD from UCLA before completing integrated plastic surgery residency at Harvard and a fellowship in Craniofacial Surgery at NYU. He is an active clinician, scientist and educator with over 200 peer-reviewed publications and presentations, 20 book chapters, dozens of invited lectures, and multiple NIH and foundational grants. Dr. Vyas is passionate about advancing knowledge and skill for cleft care worldwide, partnering with Global Smile Foundation as both a clinician and Director of Research.

Dr. Kamlesh Patel

After completing a pediatric craniofacial fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital, he joined the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Washington University in St. Louis 2011. He is Director of Craniofacial and Medical Director of the Operating Rooms at Saint Louis Children’s Hospital (SLCH). He treats patients with craniosynostosis or other craniofacial abnormalities (congenital or traumatic). He obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation in May 2017 at Washington University to advance his ability to perform high quality clinical research and this program allows him to take advantage of the tremendous resources available for faculty and residents. His research focus is in craniofacial with particular interest in craniosynostosis and cleft lip and palate.

David M. Yates, DMD, MD, FACS

Dr. David Yates MD, DMD, FACS is passionate about serving children with Cranial and Facial deformities and Cleft Lip and Palate. He is a Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon and was recently awarded the inaugural “Physician of the Year” award by El Paso Children’s Hospital. He is the Division Chief of Cranial and Facial Surgery at El Paso Children’s Hospital and has been critical in bringing complex craniofacial surgery to the region. In addition to being a partner with High Desert Oral and Facial Surgery, he directs the craniofacial clinic at El Paso Children’s Hospital and the craniofacial clinic at Providence Memorial Hospital. He has also been integral in starting a clinic for children with Cleft Lip and Palate in Juarez, Mexico at the Hospital De La Familia (FEMAP). He is now happily settled with his wife and four kids serving the greater El Paso/Las Cruces/Juarez region.

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What is Otolaryngology: More than Tonsils and Boogers
webinar

Come learn more about the jobs of Otolaryngologists (also known as ENT doctors!). We will discuss the breadth and depth of what ENT doctors cover with case descriptions. Medical students and residents of different levels will be on a panel to answer questions about the journey to and through Otolaryngology residency.


Dr. Sara Yang

Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery / Resident Physician, PGY 5
Loyola University Medical Center

Dr Yang grew up in the arid and desert like climate of Eastern Washington before spending four years in rainy Seattle during her undergrad years, majoring in Neurobiology at the University of Washington. She then moved to sunny Southern California to complete her medical education at Loma Linda University School of Medicine. She is currently finishing her chief year of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery residency at Loyola University Medical Center in Chicago, enjoying both life in the Windy City and surviving the cold winters. She recently matched to fellowship at Oregon Health and Science University in Facial Plastics and Reconstruction with Dr. Wax to specialize in microvascular reconstruction of complex head and neck defects. She is excited to return to the west coast and explore all the nature that Oregon has to offer.

Steven Goicoechea, MD

Resident physician
University of Nebraska Medical Center

Steven is originally from San Diego, CA and attended the University of Notre Dame where he studied anthropology. He then earned a master's degree at Boston University and completed a year of service with Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest in Yakima, WA. Steven recently graduated from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and will be starting otolaryngology residency at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Alice Su, BS

Medical Student
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

Alice is originally from San Jose, CA and attended UC Berkeley where she studied Molecular and Cell Biology as well as Nutrition. She is starting her fourth year at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, and preparing to apply for otolaryngology residency.

Morgan Sandelski, MD

Resident
Loyola University Medical Center Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department

Dr. Sandelski grew up in Northwest Indiana, leaving the state for undergrad at the University of Michigan, and returning for medical school at Indiana University School of Medicine. She is in her second year at Loyola for ENT residency. She is undecided for plans after residency, with current interests in head and neck oncology and facial plastics and reconstruction.

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The Ins and Outs of Medical Research & Publication
webinar

The International Journal of Medical Students and CSurgeries have come together to provide and exclusive inside scoop on the world of medical publications. They will review how to properly research and submit an article along with selecting the best journal to publish through.

Francisco Javier Bonilla-Escobar, MD
Juliana Bonilla-Velez, MD

Editor in Chief
International Journal of Medical Students

Francisco is the Editor in Chief of the IJMS. He is a physician and has a master's in epidemiology from the Universidad del Valle (Colombia). He is currently finishing a PhD in Clinical Research and Translational Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also the CEO of the research foundation Science to Serve the Community, SCISCO (Colombia), and is an Assistant Professor at Universidad del Valle in Colombia teaching research to ophthalmology residents.

Francisco is a researcher of several groups in public health, ophthalmology and visual sciences, injuries, mental health, global surgery, and rehabilitation, and he was ranked as an Associate Researcher by the Colombian Ministry of Science, Innovation & Technology."

Pediatric Otolaryngologist / Assistant Professor
Seattle Children's Hospital / University of Washington

Dr. Bonilla-Velez is a pediatric otolaryngologist at Seattle Children's Hospital and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Washington. Originally from Cali, Colombia, Dr. Bonilla-Velez completed her medical school in the Universidad del Valle, Colombia. She then did a postdoctoral research year at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, after which she started residency at the University of Arkansas for Medical Studies in Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery before coming to Seattle Children’s for fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology. She also serves as a founding editor of the International Journal of Medical Students (IJMS).

Gresham Richter, MD, FACS, FAAP
Deepak Mehta, MD

Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology / Professor and Vice Chair of Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Gresham Richter, MD, FACS, FAAP is a Professor, Vice Chair, and Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and Arkansas Children’s (AC). Dr. Richter received his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Colorado. He completed his residency in Otolaryngology at UAMS and a fellowship in Pediatric Otolaryngology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. He returned to Arkansas to join UAMS faculty and founded the Arkansas Vascular Biology Program, a robust laboratory at AC dedicated to understanding and discovering new therapies for complex vascular lesions. Outside of the hospital, Dr. Richter is an entrepreneur and CEO of GDT Innovations.

Professor of Otorhinolaryngology / Director, Pediatric Aerodigestive Center
Baylor College of Medicine / Texas Children's Hospital

Director, Pediatric Aerodigestive Center, Texas Children's Hospital | Professor of Otolaryngology, Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Mehta's clinical interests are complex airway surgery, pediatric swallowing disorders and head and neck masses,along with general otolaryngology. His research interest includes outcomes of airway surgery, laryngeal cleft management and outcomes of sleep disorders.

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Csurgeries Was Live! You’ve Matched! What’s Next? With Dr. Juliana Bonilla-velez
news

On April 11th, 2018 we were honoured to have Dr. Juliana Bonilla-Velez host a Facebook Live event titled ‘You’ve Matched! What’s Next?’. Dr. Bonilla-Velez is the chief resident for Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Originally from Colombia, she is also a founder, editorial board member and former Editor in Chief of the International Journal of Medical Students.

Dr. Bonilla-Velez shared her tips on the exciting transition from medical school to residency.  Medical students will find her discussion and step by step instructions interesting and informative as she fills in the gaps in terms of what happens next!


Topics Dr. Bonilla-Velez covers include:

  • First off, celebrate, you did it!
  • What to do in the months leading up to your residency
  • Preparing for paperwork from your new institutions
  • Moving to new cities
  • Your first day of residency
  • Reaching out for support, it’s okay to ask for help
  • Educate yourself with survival guide like materials to know what is expected of you
  • Managing clinical responsibilities
  • Taking care of yourself
  • Staying engaged with activities outside the clinic: Volunteering, research, academics, field organisations & associations
  • Staying on top of your readings and research to continue progressing in your clinical studies
  • Building leadership by getting involved in the medical community, student leadership groups, mentorships
  • Setting goals over your residency
  • The benefits of working with Journal Publications – IJMS. 

Key Take-Aways:

  • Your colleagues have all been through it before, they can support you!
  • Take your time, don’t get overwhelmed by your clinical responsibilities and make sure to take care of yourself first
  • Keep and build connections in academia, the medical community and in your clinical field
  • Seek leadership opportunities within your clinical field
  • Set goals you can achieve over your residency.

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How Surgical Videos Benefitted This Aspiring Surgeon’ By Andrew J Goates, Md
news

 Andrew J. Goates, MD is a first-year Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery resident at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He is passionate about patient and physician education through  the use of video and digital media and a member of the CSurgery Student Leaders. You can follow him on Twitter @goatesworld and on Instagram @goatolaryngologist. 

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“I like making movies, but I’m not sure what I’m going to do with it. Hopefully I’ll figure it out.”

That was my response. Those were my big career goals. It was our first date and I had just blown my opportunity to knock her socks off with my impressive aspirations and intellectual prowess. Somehow, despite her better judgement and advice of close friends, she continued allowing my romantic pursuits. Eventually, with her support, I discovered my love for medicine. We talked about my role models, many of which were in the medical field. I recognized that I wanted to do something everyday that brought new questions, challenges, and opportunities and at the same time directly impacted peoples’ lives. Medicine became the natural fit.

While in medical school and I spent the first two years trying to gain as much knowledge and experience as I could in order to match into my dream specialty of Otolaryngology– Head & Neck Surgery. I worked in the department as often as I could: helping with publications; attending lectures and grand rounds; all the while learning from residents, fellows, and staff surgeons. One of my mentors approached me about doing a surgical video on a new technique he had learned for excision of branchial cleft cysts. I didn’t know how to remove any type of cyst, and I didn’t even know what a branchial cleft cyst was. But, I did have a natural drive and curiosity, the motivation to learn, and a basic video editing skill set that I could contribute.

Through developing that video I saw the potential of surgical video footage in many aspects of education in surgery and medicine. I learned the practical anatomy relevant to this surgery. I learned about common pitfalls and picked up on the subtleties of technique and tissue handling. Although at that point I had not performed a single surgery, I got to spend a few moments in the mind of a surgeon. I became more prepared for when my opportunity to operate would soon come. In addition, I got to spend important moments learning from and working with a phenomenal surgeon. That project helped strengthen our mentoring relationship and lead to more opportunities for me to reach my potential with a strong letter of recommendation for residency applications.

Since that time I have consistently used high-quality surgical videos to research procedures, learn complex anatomy, and to augment my study of head and neck surgery. Surgical videos can help a learner assimilate difficult three-dimensional relationships and translate memorized anatomy and concepts into practical understanding needed to safely navigate a given operation. This allows a growing surgeon have a foundation on which to build the surgical skills needed to become a proficient and safe surgeon. I have really appreciated the work of CSurgeries in housing excellent surgical videos and making them available for all to benefit from.

So my career does involve making movies after all. But they are far more meaningful than what I had in mind. They don’t just tell stories. These movies teach, inspire, and motivate aspiring surgeons and inform nervous patients and their families from all over the world.

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CSurgeries: An International Perspective With Dr. Juliana Bonilla-Velez
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Dr. Juliana Bonilla-Velez

PGY 4 – Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Tell me a little bit about yourself.

My name is Juliana Bonilla-Velez, and I’m a 4th year resident at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. I’m originally from Colombia, and that’s where I did my medical training. I was very fortunate to work with Dr. Rocco at Mass Eye & Ear Institute as a postdoctoral research fellow on oropharyngeal cancer, and then I came to do my residency training at UAMS. Here, I was also very fortunate to be able to work with Dr. Richter – who is not only one of the founders but an avid promoter of CSurgeries.

He introduced me to CSurgeries very early on in my training. It really is an amazing tool, especially for residents to be able to easily visualize all the things that you are reading!  At times, it can be difficult to put all the aspects of a surgery together (especially if you haven’t seen that type of surgery before) or to learn how different people [surgeons] do things. There are so many different techniques for each type of surgery, so I feel like it’s a great avenue that enriches resident education.

Dr. Bonilla-Velez, I understand you published with CSurgeries in June 2016.  What can you tell me about your experience? Was it easy? Difficult?

It was my first experience making a video, so that was a little challenging. I was working together with a medical student and we made a really good team.  She worked a bit more on the media aspect of helping to put the video together, but then we were able to work together and incorporate some of the more technical aspects of the surgery, and important steps and findings to highlight.

In fact, the recording of the procedure was not difficult at all. It did not interfere with the clinical aspect of what we were doing. The surgery went great, and recording did not obstruct it, make it slower or impose any impediment to the completion of the surgery. At the same time, it was very insightful to be able to review all of it and to put it together in a format that would be easy to teach others what was going on. Not only was it a great experience…it was fun!

It’s very interesting that as a resident you were able to partner with a medical student to take over the technical aspect of video recording and editing while you were able to oversee and supervise the surgical content. Having recently partnered with the International Association of Student Surgical Societies, it confirms that we’re going in the right direction. 

Absolutely. Even as a medical student, I was very involved in research and publication. I was actually one of the founders of the International Journal of Medical Students which was an amazing experience, but also gave me a better understanding of the other side of making science. From a medical student’s perspective, it is such an enriching and fulfilling experience to be able to participate in all of these avenues for publishing – participate in research projects, writing manuscripts or making videos – just learning how to think in that way, getting your feet wet and learning all of these skills are so important for the rest of your career as a physician, especially now with evidence-based medicine.

How has publishing with CSurgeries contributed to education as a surgical resident?

As an author, it was very interesting to be able to go through the process of putting the video together, thinking through all the technical aspects of what we were doing and summarizing it in a short format that would be easy to show others.

As a viewer and user of CSurgeries, it allows you to be able to see different techniques for different types of surgeries. Perhaps the Attending at your institution is doing the procedure one way, but seeing how others are doing it in other places certainly enriches your education. In preparation for surgery, CSurgeries publications allow you to see what the steps are, so you can get a more visual understanding of what it is you are going to be doing and what you’re reading in the books. In surgery, even more so than other specialties, this is critical. Learning in 2D in one thing.  Being able to see in 3D what it is you’re actually going to be seeing in surgery is quite another. For that reason, CSurgeries is definitely a very valuable tool – especially for people in training.

As a user of CSurgeries, is there a particular CSurgeries publication you recommend (either within or outside of your specialty) you recommend for our members to view and why?

As a 4th year resident, at least in my program, we haven’t started our otology rotation, so I feel like I struggle a little bit more trying to imagine and put together all the otologic surgeries. I haven’t been exposed to them nor have I seen them before. For that reason, one video that was very useful to me that I really enjoyed was Right Stapedotomy that was published by Dr. Babu at the Michigan Ear Institute. Just seeing the video, especially with the ear (it’s such intricate anatomy) was extremely useful. Having access to such a high-quality video that walks you through the surgery, seeing all the steps clearly, was really great.

Of course, there are going to be personal circumstances for which you would find a video more educational than others- depending on what your institution does or your prior experiences. One of the really neat things about CSurgeries is that there’s so much variety- not only within otolaryngology, but among all the other specialties. It’s got something for everyone.

You mentioned you are also a founder of the International Journal of Medical Students. What can you tell me about the IJMS?

Our vision was to create a space that would be made by medical students for medical students to promote research and to provide an avenue for publication that would include all specialties. We aim to speak to medical students who are in a unique part of their training. Not only do we offer a window for them to show their publications, but we are able to help get them to that high-quality level of having a paper that is amenable for publication.

It was also a very exciting to build a team of people that would be able to represent all  – not only from around the globe but also those in different stages of their training. We have mentors who have guided us from the beginning, taught us to put all these pieces together and to provide not only an avenue but a service for medical students worldwide where they can publish their work and learn. Especially nowadays where medicine is guided by the paradigm of Evidence-Based Medicine, it’s critical for physicians to be able not only to do research but to understand the research that is published. It serves to train both the authors and the students who are learning to be the editors about all the different aspects of the publication process.  It’s been a really very rewarding experience knowing we’ve been able to contribute to medical students’ education worldwide.

How is publishing with CSurgeries different from publishing with IJMS? How are they similar?

It’s different in the sense that the CSurgeries is a video peer-reviewed journal. It’s very visually perfect for the surgical field because it takes you through the novel of each surgery by  showing what the key structures are and the key steps you need to be doing. It’s very educational, especially for people in training. In terms of similarities, both aim to educate physicians, students and other surgeons. IJMS provides an avenue for written publication of research along with the more traditional strategies while CSurgeries provides an avenue for video publication. Both share a common mission of education.

What advice do you have for international medical graduates looking to pursue surgical residency in the United States?

It’s certainly a very difficult task, but at the same time, it can be immensely rewarding. You have to be very passionate about what you want to do, what you want to accomplish, and what you want for your life. If your goals are clear and you can translate all that passion into hard work and dedication to your specialty, that goes a long way. It’s certainly hard but not impossible. I’d highly encourage you to push through the difficulties if you feel that’s your life mission. Don’t give up on your dreams.

What would you be doing if you were not a surgeon?

Oh gosh! There is nothing else I would rather be doing! I wish I could have a parallel life to be able to do all the things I want to do, but all at the same time. But certainly the life I would not give up is being a future pediatric otolaryngologist and be able to continue to participate in academics, in research and education, and in clinical practice and leadership.  I look forward to playing a part in furthering the field

Watch Dr. Juliana Bonilla-Velez’s video Excision of Thyroglossal Duct Cyst and her Facebook Live, You’ve Matched, What’s Next?

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Meet our Presenters for Day 1!
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The International Adult Airway Symposium is coming up on February 4th & 5th. For more information view the itinerary or register here!

Dr Gitta Madani, FRCR, MRCS, MBBS, FDSRCS, BDS

Consultant Radiologist and Honorary Senior Lecturer

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Imperial College London

Gitta Madani is a Consultant Radiologist with a specialist interest in all aspects of head and neck and skull base radiology and performs image-guided procedures in the head and neck. She is an Honorary Lecturer at Imperial College London and involved in research, training and teaching. She has authored several book chapters, various peer-reviewed articles and national imaging guidelines.


Ali Zul Jiwani, MD, MSc, DAABIP

Director of Interventional Pulmonology

Orlando Health Cancer Institute

Dr. Jiwani, is a board-certified interventional pulmonologist with the Rod Taylor Thoracic Care Center at Orlando Health Cancer Institute where he also leads the institute’s lung cancer screening program. As an interventional pulmonologist he specializes in minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy and other procedures to treat malignant and benign conditions of the airway, lungs and thorax plus pleural diseases.


David E. Rosow, MD, FACS

Director, Division of Laryngology and Voice / Associate Professor, Dept. of Otolaryngology

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Dr. Rosow is Associate Professor of Otolaryngology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where he has led the Division of Laryngology and Voice for over 10 years. His research and clinical interests include laryngeal cancer, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, vocal fold paralysis, laryngotracheal stenosis and airway reconstruction, and spasmodic dysphonia. In addition to scientific publications in these areas, he has also written and edited a textbook on evidence-based practice in Laryngology.


Professor Stephen R Durham MD FRCP

Professor of Allergy and Respiratory Medicinec

National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London and Royal Brompton Hospital London

Professor Durham is Head of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at NHLI and has run a joint Nose Clinic with Professor Hesham Saleh for many years. His research interests include allergic rhinitis, asthma and translational studies in allergen immunotherapy. He is a member of the Steering Committee, Immune Tolerance Network, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, USA.


Professor Jane Setterfield

Professor of Oral & Dermatological Medicine

Guy's & St Thomas Hospital & King's College London

Jane Setterfield is Professor of Oral and Dermatological Medicine at King’s College London and Consultant in Dermatology at St John’s Institute of Dermatology, Guy’s & St Thomas Hospitals. She leads the Oral Dermatology Service both at St John’s Institute and the Department Oral Medicine Guy’s Dental Institute. Her areas of clinical interest include immunobullous diseases, lichenoid disorders vulval dermatoses and mucocutaneous diseases. Her research areas include diagnostic techniques, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical outcome measures and optimising therapeutic approaches for mucocutaneous diseases.


Laura Matrka, MD

Associate Professor

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Laura Matrka, MD, is an Associate Professor at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery. She graduated magna cum laude from Dartmouth College with a BA in English and concentrations in Anthropology and Spanish, completed medical school at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, completed her residency in Otolaryngology at The Ohio State University, and completed a Laryngology fellowship at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio. She is a full-time clinician who devotes significant additional time to clinical research, focusing on complicated airway management, tracheostomy complications, dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, gender-affirming health care, and opioid-related research, among other topics. She was inducted into the American Laryngologic Association in 2020, the Triological Society in 2019, and the American Bronchoesophageal Association in 2015.


Alexander Gelbard, MD

Co-Director

Vanderbilt Center for Complex Airway Reconstruction (AeroVU)

Dr. Gelbard is a board certified Otolaryngologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville Tennessee specializing in adult laryngeal and tracheal disease. He completed his undergraduate education at Stanford University, medical school at Tulane School of Medicine, and internship and residency at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas. Dr. Gelbard completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in Immunology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center as well as a clinical fellowship in Laryngeal Surgery at Vanderbilt School of Medicine. He has authored numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and lectures internationally on adult airway disease. He currently is Co-director of the Vanderbilt Center for Complex Airway Reconstruction (AeroVU). Additionally, he is a NIH-funded principle investigator studying the immunologic mechanisms underlying benign laryngeal and tracheal disease. He is also PI of an externally funded prospective multi-institutional study of idiopathic subglottic stenosis (iSGS) and managing director of the North American Airway Collaborative (NoAAC). NoAAC is a funded, multi-institutional consortium with 40 participating centers in the United States and Europe that works to exchange information concerning the treatment of adult airway disease. It is composed of outstanding collaborators who pursue a unique combination of genetic, molecular, and epidemiologic based approaches to investigate the critical factors underlying the pathogenesis and outcomes of laryngotracheal stenosis.


Taner Yilmaz, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey

Dr. Yilmaz has worked in laryngology since 2000. He is a member of ELS, ALA and IAP, publishing 94 international manuscripts which received 1100 citations. On top of those achieveiments, he also has two patents for a laryngoscope for arytenoidectomies and an epiglottis holding forceps for grasping a floppy epiglottis that folds inside the larynx during larygoscopy.


Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS

Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Damrose is Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery and (by courtesy) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine in the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the founding Chief of the Division of Laryngology and Program Director of the Stanford Fellowship in Laryngology & Laryngeal Surgery. He is member of the American Laryngological Association as well as the Triological Society, and has authored or coauthored more than 80 peer reviewed publications and 16 book chapters.


Kate Heathcote, MBBS, FRCS

Consultant Laryngologist

University Hospitals Dorset

Kate Heathcote established the Robert White Centre for Airway, Voice and Swallow to provide a comprehensive diagnostic and treatment service. She has lectured and trained surgeons nationally and internationally in cutting edge laryngology techniques.


Phillip Song, MD

Division Director in Laryngology

Imperial College LonMassachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Dr Song is the Division Director of Laryngology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery at Harvard Medical School. He specializes in laryngology with a special interest in neurolaryngology and central airway disease.


Brianna Crawley, MD

Associate Professor, Co-Director

Loma Linda University Voice and Swallowing Center

Dr. Crawley is a board-certified otolaryngologist and member of the Academy of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, the ABEA, and the post-grad ALA. Her interests include neurolaryngology, swallowing disorders, performing voice and the surgical airway. She continues to work in new fields of research focusing on presbylarynx and presbyphonia, neurolaryngology, and understanding the patient experience.


Ramon Franco Jr, MD

Medical Director, Voice and Speech Lab, Senior Laryngologist

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA

Dr. Ramon Franco is a board-certified laryngologist who specializes in voice, swallowing, and breathing disorders. His main areas of expertise are in the diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders, airway stenosis, laryngeal cancer, and neurological disorders affecting the voice box. He also has special interests in the medical and surgical care of the professional voice. He serves as an Executive Board Member for the Massachusetts Society of Otolaryngology and is a fellow for the Triological Society and the American Laryngological Association.


Clark A. Rosen, MD

Co-Director / Chief - Division of Laryngology

UCSF Voice and Swallowing Center

Clark Rosen, MD is a Co-Director of the UCSF Voice and Swallowing Center, Chief of the Division of Laryngology, Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the F Lewis Morrison MD Endowed chair of Laryngology. Dr. Rosen inaugurated modern laryngology at the University of Pittsburgh beginning in 1995 creating a dedicated center of excellence in Laryngology: University of Pittsburgh Voice Center. Dr. Rosen originated the outstanding Fellowship in Laryngology and Care of the Professional Voice at the University of Pittsburgh in 2002 and trained over 15 fellows in Larynogology and numerous visiting Otolaryngologists until 2018. He is now the director of the Laryngology fellowship at the UCSF Voice and Swallowing Center. Dr. Rosen has been a sought after speaker internationally and has had major service to multiple publications and professional societies. He is a founding member of the Fall Voice Conference, was the Vice Chair of the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAOHNS), and was the Treasurer of the American Laryngological Association (ALA) and is now president of the ALA.


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Meet our Presenters for Day 2!
news

The International Adult Airway Symposium is coming up this weekend! For more information view the itinerary or register here!

Dr. Vyvy Young

Associate Professor and the Associate Residency Program Director in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

University of California – San Francisco

VyVy Young, MD, is an Associate Professor and the Associate Residency Program Director in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California – San Francisco. Dr. Young received her undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Louisville, in Louisville, Kentucky, where she also pursued her Otolaryngology training. She then completed a fellowship in Laryngology and Care of the Professional Voice at the University of Pittsburgh Voice Center. She currently serves the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery as member of the Annual Meeting Program Committee and Executive Committee for ENThealth.org. She is immediate past-chair of the Voice Committee and the Women in Otolaryngology Communications Committee and was recently selected as chair of the Finance and Audit Committee of the American Broncho-Esophagological Association.


Justin Roe, PhD, FRCSLT

Clinical Service Lead - Speech and Language Therapy – National Centre for Airway Reconstruction

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Dr. Roe is a clinical-academic and service lead, specialising in dysphagia in benign and malignant head and neck disease. He leads the speech and language therapy service for the National Centre for Airway Reconstruction at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and is a consultant and service lead at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. He is an Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer at Imperial College London and an investigator on a number of NIHR portfolio studies. He is currently on an NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre/ Imperial Health Charity funded post-doctoral research fellowship. He is an elected council member for the British Laryngological Association and British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists.


Professor Anil Patel MBBS PhD FRCA

Clinical Anaesthetist / Chairman of Department of Anaesthesia

Royal National ENT & Eastman Dental Hospital

Professor Anil Patel graduated from University College London in 1991. He is a clinical anaesthetist and continues to develop and refine the largest experience of anaesthetising adult airway patients under general anaesthesia (> 6,000 procedures) in the UK, probably Europe and possibly the world. His research interests include all aspects of shared airway and difficult airway management. Professor Patel has been an invited speaker to over 300 national and international meetings in 38 countries. He has over 130+ peer reviewed publications, 25 book chapters, over 4,500 citations and an h-index of 25.


Robbi A. Kupfer, MD

Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

University of Michigan

Dr. Kupfer is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan who specializes in Laryngology and Bronchoesophagology. She is the Program Director for the Laryngology Fellowship as well as the Otolaryngology Residency at the University of Michigan.


Alexander T. Hillel, MD, FACS

Associate Professor

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Alexander Hillel is a Laryngologist, Residency Program Director, and Vice Director of Education in the Johns Hopkins Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery. His clinical practice and research centers on the treatment, prevention, and causes of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS).


Dale Ekbom, MD

Associate Professor of Otolaryngology / Director of Voice Disorders/Laryngology

Mayo Clinic

Residency in Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan with a fellowship in Laryngology/Care of the Professional Voice at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Clinically specializing in voice, especially management of vocal fold paralysis, Zenker’s diverticulum and Cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction, early laryngeal cancer, and airway compromise due to laryngeal, subglottic, and tracheal stenosis. Research interests include idiopathic subglottic stenosis and GPA with surgical and medical management of the airway, vocal fold paralysis, new injectables using Jellyfish collagen.


Dr. Ricky Thakrar

Consultant Chest Physician

University College London Hospital

Dr. Ricky Thakrar qualified in Medicine from Imperial College London. He trained in Respiratory Medicine at the Royal Brompton Hospital and completed his training in Northwest London. He was appointed to a three-year academic fellowship at UCL where his PhD examined state of the art bronchoscopy techniques for managing cancers arising in central airways and lung. He is a Consultant in Thoracic Medicine and his main interests are in interventional bronchoscopy procedures (laser resection, airway stenting, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and brachytherapy) for pre-malignant and malignant disease of the tracheobronchial tree.


Dr. Michael Rutter

Director of the Aerodigestive Center

Cincinnati Children's Hospital

Dr. Rutter is an ENT surgeon specializing in pediatric otolaryngology with an emphasis on airway problems in children, adolescents and young adults. His interests include tracheal reconstruction and complex airway surgery. Always a problem-solver, he strives to involve the patient in their own care by having them help evaluate the issue and then craft a solution together. He was drawn to his career by the challenge and highly individualized nature of pediatric airway problems and management. Dr. Rutter enjoys working in a multidisciplinary team setting and focusing on coordinated care for complex childhood airway conditions. He was honored to receive the 2016 Gabriel Frederick Tucker Award from the American Laryngological Association, and the 2018 Sylvan Stool Teaching Award from the Society for Ear Nose and Throat Advancement in Children (SENTAC). These awards are for his contributions to the field of pediatric laryngology. In addition to caring for patients, he is also dedicated to his research trying to find improvements in airway management.


Christopher T. Wootten, MD, MMHC

Director, Pediatric Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Wootten has a longstanding interest in surgical management of congenital and acquired airway disorders.  To better equip himself to lead the Pediatric ENT service through expansion, evolution of practice models, and differentiation into multidisciplinary care, Dr. Wootten obtained a Masters of Management in Health Care at Vanderbilt’s Owen School of Business in 2017.  Areas of his professional research emphasis include airway obstruction in children and adults and aerodigestive care. He innovates minimally invasive surgical techniques in the head and neck.  Dr. Wootten is actively investigating the role of eosinophil and mast cell-based inflammation in the pediatric larynx.


Karla O'Dell, M.D.

Assistant Professor / Co-director

USC Voice Center, Caruso Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery @ University of Southern California / USC Center for Airway Intervention and Reconstruction

Karla O’Dell, MD, specializes in head and neck surgery and disorders of the voice, airway and swallowing. She is cofounder and codirector of the USC Airway Intervention & Reconstruction Center (USC Air Center).


Jeanne L. Hatcher, MD, FACS

Co-Director of the Emory Voice Center and Associate Professor of Otolaryngology

Emory University School of Medicine

Dr. Hatcher has been at Emory since 2014 after completing her laryngology fellowship with Dr. Blake Simpson; she specializes in open and endoscopic airway surgery as well as voice disorders. Dr. Hatcher is a member of the ABEA and post-graduate member of the ALA and also serves on the Ethics and Voice Committees for the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.


Mr. Lee Aspland

Patient / Freelance Artist

Lee Aspland Photography

Lee Aspland is a photographer, author and mindful practitioner who creates photography that reflects his feelings about living in such a glorious world. He specializes in Mindful Photography, capturing a fleeting feeling or thought, a hope or fear, a frozen single moment in time.


Gemma Clunie, MSc, BA (Hon), MRCSLT

Clinical Specialist Speech-Language Pathologist (Airways/ENT) and HEE/NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust/ Imperial College London, Department of Surgery & Cancer

Gemma is a Clinical Specialist Speech and Language Therapist with an interest in voice and swallowing disorders that is particularly focused on the benign ENT, head and neck, respiratory and critical care populations. Gemma is a current NIHR/HEE Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow at Imperial College London. Her PhD studies focus on the voice and swallowing difficulties of airway stenosis patients. She is based at Charing Cross Hospital in London where she has worked for the last six years as part of the National Centre for Airway Reconstruction, Europe’s largest centre for the management of airway disorders.


Niall C. Anderson, CPsychol, MSc, BSc

Lead Psychologist (formerly Respiratory Highly Specialist Health Psychologist)

Bart's Health NHS Trust (formerly Central & North West London NHS Foundation Trust)

Niall is a HCPC Registered & BPS Chartered Practitioner Health Psychologist, and BPS RAPPS Registered Supervisor. Niall has specialist experience of working within healthcare systems with people with long-term health conditions at all system levels to support physical, psychological and social wellbeing. Niall worked in the Airway Service at Charing Cross Hospital (London, UK) between January-December 2021 in order to develop and implement the Airway Psychology Service.


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Introducing a Two-Part Sialendoscopy Series!
news

Brought to you by our partnership with Cook Medical, we are having a two-part series on Sialendoscopy. The sessions will feed into one another, the first covering basics like a review of instrumentation and set up, as well as some of the most basic interventions you will see.

The second session will assume a basic knowledge of the procedure and will deal with complex interventions including both endoscopic and combined open procedures, advanced radiology, and complication management for revision surgery and in-office procedures.

Meet the Course Directors!

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD

Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery

University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, earned his doctoral degree from the University of Mumbai. After graduating in 1998, he completed a residency in Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery at the TN Medical College & BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, India, with triple honors. Subsequently, he completed two head neck surgery fellowships, and trained at at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, which is India's most prestigious cancer institute. After completing an Advanced Head Neck Oncologic Surgery fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, he became an Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center, prior to joining the LSU Health Sciences Center in July 2008. His clinical interests are head neck surgery and salivary endoscopy. His research interests include evaluating prognostic markers and clinical outcomes of head and neck cancer therapy and treatment of salivary gland disorders.


Barry M Schaitkin, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology

UPMC Pittsburgh

Dr. Schaitkin specializes in the treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic conditions of the salivary glands. He practices at UPMC in the Department of Otolaryngology and is affiliated with UPMC branches all across the city of Pittsburgh. He completed his medical degree and residency at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.


Meet the Presenters!


Jolie Chang, MD

Associate Professor, Chief of Sleep Surgery and General Otolaryngology

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Chang specializes in sleep apnea surgery and minimally invasive approaches to the salivary duct with sialendoscopy. She has interest in studying patient reported outcomes after sialendoscopy procedures.


Mark Marzouk, MD

Clinical Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SUNY Upstate Medical University

Dr. Marzouk completed his residency training in 2010 from the UPMC Department of Otolaryngology. He is currently the Division Chief of Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery in Syracuse. He is also the Associate Program Director of Residency Programs.


David W. Eisele, MD. FACS

Andelot Professor and Director - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Eisele is the Past-President of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery and a member of the NCCN Head and Neck Cancer Panel. He has served as a member of the Residency Review Committee for Otolaryngology, as Chair of the Advisory Council for Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery for the American College of Surgeons, President of the American Head and Neck Society, and as Vice-President of the Triological Society. He served as President of the Maryland Society of Otolaryngology and is a former Governor of the American College of Surgeons.


M. Boyd Gillespie, MD, MSc, FACS

Professor and Chair

UTHSC Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

M. Boyd Gillespie is Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he a completed residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Dr. Gillespie earned a Masters in Clinical Research at the Medical University of South Carolina, and is board certified in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Sleep Medicine. He has published over 150 academic papers and is editor of the textbook Gland-Preserving Salivary Surgery: A Problem-Based Approach. He is a former Director of the American Board of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (ABOHNS) and current member of the otolaryngology section of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).


M. Allison Ogden, MD FACS

Professor & Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations - Department of Otolaryngology

Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Ogden is a Professor and Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University School of Medicine. She graduated from the Washington University School of Medicine in 2002 and went on to complete her residency there as well in Otolaryngology in 2007. Her clinical interests include sialendoscopy, nasal obstructions, and hearling loss. In 2015 Dr. Ogden was listed in "Best Doctors in America", an honor that continues to this day.


Arjun S. Joshi, MD

Professor of Surgery

The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences

Arjun Joshi, MD is board-certified in Otolaryngology and Head & Neck surgery by both the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Joshi received his medical degree from the State University of New York at Syracuse and completed his residency at The George Washington University Medical Center. His areas of expertise include: Head and Neck Cancer, Head and Neck Masses, Head and Neck Reconstruction, Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, and Salivary Endoscopy.


Henry T. Hoffman, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology / Professor of Radiation Oncology

University of Iowa Healthcare

Dr. Henry T. Hoffman is an ENT-otolaryngologist in Iowa City, Iowa and is affiliated with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He received his medical degree from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.


David M. Cognetti, MD, FACS

Professor and Chair of Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Cognetti received his BS in Biology from Georgetown University and his MD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University before completing a fellowship in Advanced Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Cognetti returned to Jefferson, his professional home, as faculty in 2008.


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Introducing our presenters for the upcoming Cleft Lip Revision webinar!
news

This webinar comes as the latest in a long line of installments dealing with the Cleft Palate. In this session, attendees will learn various tips and tricks to a successful cleft lip revision procedure. There will be a Q&A session to discuss common challenges and how to address them.

Meet the Course Directors

Dr. Larry Hartzell
Dr. Steven Goudy

Director of Cleft Lip and Palate / Pediatric ENT Surgeon

Arkansas Children's Hospital / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Larry Hartzell, MD FAAP is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is the Director of the Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship. Dr Hartzell also has been the Cleft Team Director in Arkansas since 2012. He is passionate about international humanitarian mission work and dedicates much of his research efforts to cleft surgical and clinical care as well as velopharyngeal insufficiency. Dr Hartzell is actively involved in multiple academic societies and organizations including the AAO-HNS and ACPA.

Professor / Director of Division of Otolaryngology

Emory University School of Medicine / Children's Healthcare in Atlanta

Dr. Goudy is a professor at Emory University School of Medicine and the director of the division of otolaryngology at Children’s Healthcare in Atlanta. Dr. Goudy’s clinical job involves repair of craniofacial malformations including cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence, and he also participates in head and neck tumor resection and reconstruction.


Meet the Presenters

Lauren K. Leeper, MD, FACS
Ashley E. Manlove DMD, MD, FACS

Associate Professor of Department of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Dr. Leeper completed her residency training in Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery at the Medical University of South Carolina in 2012 and fellowship training in Pediatric Otolaryngology at Arkansas Children's Hospital in 2014. She returned to the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill in 2014 on faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery. She is the current Fellowship Director and Medical Director of the Children's Cochlear Implant Center. She is married to Bradley and they have one daughter Sutton and a baby boy arriving this month.

Residency Program Director / Director Cleft and Craniofacial Team

Carle Foundation Hospital

Dr. Manlove joined Carle Foundation Hospital in 2016 as a fellowship trained cleft and craniomaxillofacial surgeon. She is the director of the cleft and craniofacial team at Carle. In 2018 she was name “Rising Star Physician” and that same year she also became the residency program director. Outside of work, she loves spending time with her family and she is an avid runner.

Deborah S. F. Kacmarynski, MD, MS
Jordan Swanson, MD, MSc

Associate Professor - Craniofacial Abnormalities & Pediatric Otolaryngology / Co-Director of Cleft and Craniofacial Team

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics

Dr. Kacmarynski is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at the University of Iowa, working as a pediatric otolaryngologist and a cleft and craniofacial surgeon with co-directorship for the cleft and craniofacial team at the University of Iowa. Research focus is on biomedical collaborations with oral cleft and craniofacial surgical problems including craniofacial airway, tissue engineering solution development, outcomes research and patient-centered outcomes research collaboratives. I am excited about the long-term impacts of research leading very directly to significant improvements in o

Linton Whitaker Endowed Chair in Craniofacial Surgery

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Plastic Surgery

Jordan Swanson, MD, MSc, is an attending surgeon in the Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Oral Surgery at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with special clinical expertise in cleft, craniofacial, and pediatric plastic surgery. He holds the Linton A. Whitaker Endowed Chair in Plastic, Reconstructive and Oral Surgery.

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