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We found 25 results for University of California in video, leadership, webinar & news

video (11)

A TECHNIQUE TO PREVENT BAR DISPLACEMENT IN THE NUSS PROCEDURE
video

From the APSA 2017 Annual Meeting proceedings A TECHNIQUE TO PREVENT BAR DISPLACEMENT IN THE NUSS PROCEDURE Claire E. Graves, MD1, Andrew Phelps, MD1, Olajire Idowu, Jr., MD2, Sunghoon Kim, MD2, Benjamin E. Padilla, MD1. 1University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA, 2University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland, CA, USA. Purpose: Bar displacement is a serious complication of the Nuss procedure. Three types of displacement have been well described: lateral sliding, bar flipping and posterior disruption. We propose a simple modification in bar placement and fixation that safeguards against all three mechanisms of displacement. Methods: Nuss bar length is chosen to extend just beyond the pectus ridge on each side. Using the external bar bender, we make a gentle curve on each side of the bar, corresponding to the peak of each pectus ridge. The ends of the bar are left straight. After the bar is inserted and flipped, a stabilizer is placed on each end and slid medially, just lateral to the chest wall insertion site. After the stabilizers are in position, in situ bar benders are used to complete the curvature of the bar around the chest wall. Results: This technique addresses all three methods of displacement (Fig.1). Lateral sliding is prevented by locking the stabilizers in place with in situ bending just lateral to the chest exit site (A). The bar cannot move laterally as the stabilizers abut the chest wall exit site (B). Placing the stabilizers more medially positions them at the inflection point where the ribs angle superiorly. Thus the stabilizers straddle two ribs on the anterior chest (C). The stabilizers therefore have a broader base of support, preventing bar flipping. Finally, placing the stabilizers more anterior allows them to directly counteract the posterior pressure on the bar from the sternum. Instead of relying on the intercostal musculature, the ribs themselves serve to support the stabilizers and bar from posterior dislocation. Conclusion: We report a technical modification of pectus bar placement and stabilization to minimize the risk of three common mechanisms of displacement.

A TECHNIQUE TO PREVENT BAR DISPLACEMENT IN THE NUSS PROCEDURE
video

A TECHNIQUE TO PREVENT BAR DISPLACEMENT IN THE NUSS PROCEDURE Claire E. Graves, MD1, Andrew Phelps, MD1, Olajire Idowu, Jr., MD2, Sunghoon Kim, MD2, Benjamin E. Padilla, MD1. 1University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA, 2University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland, CA, USA. Purpose: Bar displacement is a serious complication of the Nuss procedure. Three types of displacement have been well described: lateral sliding, bar flipping and posterior disruption. We propose a simple modification in bar placement and fixation that safeguards against all three mechanisms of displacement. Methods: Nuss bar length is chosen to extend just beyond the pectus ridge on each side. Using the external bar bender, we make a gentle curve on each side of the bar, corresponding to the peak of each pectus ridge. The ends of the bar are left straight. After the bar is inserted and flipped, a stabilizer is placed on each end and slid medially, just lateral to the chest wall insertion site. After the stabilizers are in position, in situ bar benders are used to complete the curvature of the bar around the chest wall. Results: This technique addresses all three methods of displacement (Fig.1). Lateral sliding is prevented by locking the stabilizers in place with in situ bending just lateral to the chest exit site (A). The bar cannot move laterally as the stabilizers abut the chest wall exit site (B). Placing the stabilizers more medially positions them at the inflection point where the ribs angle superiorly. Thus the stabilizers straddle two ribs on the anterior chest (C). The stabilizers therefore have a broader base of support, preventing bar flipping. Finally, placing the stabilizers more anterior allows them to directly counteract the posterior pressure on the bar from the sternum. Instead of relying on the intercostal musculature, the ribs themselves serve to support the stabilizers and bar from posterior dislocation. Conclusion: We report a technical modification of pectus bar placement and stabilization to minimize the risk of three common mechanisms of displacement.

Pars Plana Vitrectomy and Endolaser
video

This video shows the basic steps in evacuating a vitreous hemorrhage due to a retinal vein occlusion. Surgeon & Editing: Sean Tsao M.D.

Metallic Intraocular Foreign Body removed from the retina
video

This is an eye from a young man who was working with metal and a piece of metal shot into his eye, through his cornea and lens and landed on the retina causing a crater. In this surgery we remove the metal and repair the retina. DOI: https://doi.org/10.17797/40cgy368y1

Intercostal Cryoablation: a Novel Method of Pain Management for the Nuss Procedure
video

From the APSA 2016 Annual Meeting proceedings INTERCOSTAL CRYOABLATION: A NOVEL METHOD OF PAIN MANAGEMENT FOR THE NUSS PROCEDURE Y. Julia Chen, MD, Benjamin Keller, MD, Jacob Stephenson, MD, Amy Rahm, MD, Rebecca Stark, MD, Shinjiro Hirose, MD, Gary Raff, MD. University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA. Purpose: Achieving adequate analgesia in patients undergoing the Nuss Procedure for pectus excavatum is a significant determinant of postoperative recovery. Pain management strategies have evolved throughout the last decade, however there is no consensus on the optimal regimen. Practice varies according to institution and surgeon. Intercostal cyroanalgesia has been described in the literature for long-term management of post thoracotomy pain syndrome and has been established as safe and feasible in the adult population. The aim of this video is to introduce the usage of intercostal cryoablation as a novel method of pain control in children undergoing the Nuss Procedure for pectus excavatum. Methods/Results: We demonstrate operative footage and describe the technique of intraoperative intercostal nerve ablation during the Nuss Procedure. Using the cyroanalgesia probe T3-T6 are ablated bilaterally under direct visualization with the thoracoscope prior to insertion of the Nuss bar. This provides immediate and durable postoperative analgesia. Using this method, the need for thoracic epidural has been eliminated from our practice and patients are fast-tracked with decreased length of stay. There have been no complications reported related to cryoablation in the 6 months that we have used this technique. Conclusions: Intraoperative bilateral intercostal cryoablation is a safe and feasible method of pain control in children with pectus excavatum undergoing the Nuss Procedure. DOI:https://doi.org/10.17797/9s1mvk79sn

Pars Plana Vitrectomy and Membrane Peeling
video

This video shows the fundamental steps of removing an epiretinal membrane. Surgeon: Mitul Mehta M.D. M.S. Video: Sean Tsao M.D. Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California Irvine

Vitrectomy for Retinal Detachment Repair
video

This is a short video listing out the fundamental steps and maneuvers in performing vitrectomy for retinal detachment repair. Vitrectomy is currently the most commonly employed surgical technique in repairing retinal detachment. In this case, the patient had cataract surgery performed one year prior and developed painless loss of vision over the course of one week. On examination he had an inferior macula involving bullous nasal and inferior retinal detachment. The retinal break identified during surgery was located in the the anterior portion of the eye and considered fairly small in size when compared to other types of retinal breaks. This is typical of "pseudophakic" retinal breaks, a type of small anterior retinal break thought due to traction at the vitreous base as a consequence of energy transmitted from the phacoemulsification probe used for cataract surgery. During the surgery, note how the retinal detachment pools inferiorly while the break itself is situated in the superior portion of the eye. (The surgeon sits at the head of the bed, and thus the bottom portion of the eye seen in the video corresponds to the superior portion/top portion of the eye). This is owed to the fact that liquefied vitreous humor passes through the retinal break and, as a consequence of gravity, pools at the inferior portion of the eye. At the conclusion of the video, gas is injected to fill the eye. The gas exerts an upward force on the retina and prevents it from detaching. In certain cases, the patient must position his or her head (e.g. face down, right side down, left side down) to take advantage of the upward rise of the gas bubble against any retinal breaks. In this particular case, the break was located superiorly and thus the patient was asked to maintain an upright position for the better part of two weeks to allow the retinal break to seal with the endolaser scars.

Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Macular Hole
video

Surgeons: Deepam Rusia, M.D., Mitul Mehta, M.D. Video: Jeffrey Yu Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California Irvine Macular hole is a tear in the macula, located in the center of the retina. The most common cause of macular hole is shrinking of the vitreous and subsequent pulling on the retina. Treatment involves vitrectomy, peeling of the internal limiting membrane, and infusion of gas into the eye. This patient is a 51-year-old female with a macular hole of the right eye.

Trabeculectomy
video

Aqueous humor is drained from the eye via the trabecular meshwork or the uveoscleral pathway. Trabeculectomy is performed to lower intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients by means of creating an ostium in the anterior chamber connected to a partial thickness scleral flap covered by conjunctiva. This allows aqueous humor to be filtered into the subconjunctival space and out of the eye via the venous system. Procedure First, a partial thickness traction suture using a 6-0 Vicryl is passed through the superior cornea to rotate the eye inferiorly and expose the superior quadrant. Sharp curved Vannas scissors and 0.12 forceps are used to create a conjunctival limbal peritomy superiorly at the 3 o’clock hour position. The peritomy may be placed near the limbus or fornix. Mini Westcott scissors are then used to bluntly dissect and undermine the conjunctiva and Tenon’s layer to expose the sclera posteriorly, nasally, and temporally. Hemostasis can be achieved with light cautery. Three instrument wipe sponges are soaked with 0.4 mg/m of mitomycin C and then placed underneath the conjunctiva and Tenon’s layer and superior to the sclera nasally and temporally. They are left for 90 seconds and subsequently removed. Any remaining mitomycin C is irrigated with BSS. Next, the eye is rotated inferiorly, and a #67 blade is used to create a 3.5 mm x 3 mm triangular scleral flap hinged at the limbus of about 50 to 75% thickness. Various shapes of the scleral flap can be made depending on surgeon preference (rectangular, trapezoidal etc.). Straight tying forceps are used to lift the apex while a #67 blade is used to dissect beneath the flap anteriorly until the blue-gray zone of the limbus is exposed. At this point, a crescent blade is used to create a tunnel beneath the flap into the peripheral clear cornea. An anterior chamber paracentesis is created. An MVR blade is used to enter the anterior chamber through the tunnel and the sides of the blade are used to enlarge the opening. A Kelley-Descemet punch is used to excise a corneal/trabecular block at the posterior lip of the wound until a clear ostium is observed under the flap. Colibri forceps are used to grasp and prolapse the peripheral iris tissue. An iridotomy is then performed using curved Vannas scissors. The anterior chamber is re-inflated with BSS. A 10-0 nylon suture is then used to close the scleral flap with one suture at the apex and another at each base of the flap. The flap should be closed tightly enough to ensure the anterior chamber remains formed but loose enough to allow for drainage. Only the apical suture should be sealed most tightly to allow easier suture removal if the flap is too tight. Although not featured here, BSS can be injected through the paracentesis, and the flap confirmed to be watertight. 10-0 Vicryl is then used to close the conjunctiva against the limbus, forming a tight seal. The traction suture is then removed. At the conclusion of the case, subconjunctival injection of antibiotic and/or steroid can be given inferiorly. The anterior chamber should be formed and intraocular pressure appropriate. Wound leakage should be inspected with digital palpation. Indications Trabulectomy is indicated in glaucoma with uncontrolled intraocular pressures and progressive nerve injury refractory to maximal or tolerable medication management that is causing visual disability. Cost, compliance, side effects, inconvenience, and other factors should be considered when weighing the risks and benefits of trabeculectomy. Consideration should be made when glaucoma is moderate to advanced in severity, rapidly progressive, or failed prior laser surgery. Contraindications Contraindications to trabulectomy are limited life expectancy, medical comorbidities that enhance the risks of undergoing surgery, and scarring of the superior conjunctiva. Benefits should outweigh risks of the procedure. Setup Patient is prepared and draped in the usual sterile fashion for cataract surgery. Retrobulbar block can be administered. Preoperative Workup The patient’s glaucoma stage and type are identified. History taking should involve asking patients about trauma, prior eye surgeries, bleeding disorders, intake of blood thinners or aspirin, and inflammation or infection. A complete ophthalmic examination is performed, including intraocular pressure and assessment of the angles under gonioscopy. Nerve OCTs and Humphrey visual fields are also obtained. No bloodwork, EKG, or imaging are required. Anesthesia questionnaire is completed prior to the procedure. Anatomy and Landmarks The following anatomic structures should be identified: conjunctiva, Tenon’s, sclera, and iris. It is important that the flap consist of 50-75% scleral thickness. The traction suture should be placed in the superior cornea and the peritomy created at the 3 o’clock hour position. Advantages/Disadvantages IOP control, defined as IOP < 21 mmHg and reduction at least 20% from baseline, was maintained over 5 years on average after surgery [1]. Failure rates in a study that followed patients for 3 years were 13.9% at 1 year, 28.2% at 2 years, and 30.7% at 3 years [2]. Failure was defined as persistent hypotony or uncontrolled IOP. Complications/Risks Risk factors for trabeculectomy failure include previous eye surgeries, neovascular or uveitic glaucoma, African American ethnicity, and young age [3]. Early problems in the post-op period are elevated IOP or hypotony. Complications include bleb leak (6-11%), iris prolapse obstructing flow (1.1%), encapsulated bleb (6-12%), shallow anterior chamber (13%), ptosis (12%), serous choroidal detachment (11%), choroidal effusion (4%), new synechiae formation (5%), corneal edema (6%), endophthalmitis (3%), and suprachoroidal hemorrhage (0.7%) [2,4].

Trabectome
video

This is a trabectome procedure performed on a patient with moderate severity open angle glaucoma. Trabectome is a minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) developed by Baerdveldt and Chuck where the trabecular meshwork is electrocauterized, irrigated, and aspirated under gonioscopy to improve the drainage of aqueous humor and reduce intraocular pressures. Procedure Topical TetraVisc is first administered to the eye. The patient’s head is rotated 30 degrees away from the surgeon and the microscope tilted 30 degrees toward the surgeon. The patient’s axial core can be rotated if turning the neck proves difficult. The gonioscope lens is used to visualize the trabecular meshwork, the pigmented line between Schwalbe’s line and the scleral spur. A 1.7 mm temporal clear corneal and uniplanar incision is made 2 mm anterior to the limbus. While applying continuous irrigation to deepen the angle, the Trabectome handpiece is introduced into the anterior chamber under gonioscopic visualization, and the end of the device was inserted into the inferonasal trabecular meshwork. When properly inserted, the trabecular meshwork should enter between the electrode tip and the footplate, causing the footplate to be obscured by the trabecular meshwork. The handpiece is used to ablate trabecular meshwork at a setting of flow 3 and 0.7 mW. It is rotated superiorly to create a 120 degree cleft, exposing the outer white wall of Schlemm’s canal. Care must be taken to prevent outward push on Schlemm’s canal by applying a slight inward pull during ablation. The handpiece may need to be readjusted as it is rotated in a counter-clockwise fashion. The handpiece is removed from the anterior chamber. The patient’s head is returned to a neutral position, and BSS was used to exchange viscoelastic from the anterior chamber through the temporal wound. BSS is to irrigate red blood cells from the Schlemm’s canal collector channels. The gonioscope is used to verify the cleft. At the conclusion of the case, the intraocular chamber is formed and pressure checked to be appropriate via digital palpation. Indications Trabectome is indicated for narrow-angle [1], open-angle, and secondary glaucoma with uncontrolled intraocular pressures and progressive nerve injury refractory to maximal or tolerable medication management [2]. As a MIGS, trabecome can be considered in initial stages of glaucoma due to its safety and quick routine recovery. Reduction of drops due to side effects, costs, or poor compliance are reasons to offer this procedure to patients [3]. Trabectome surgery can also be performed in conjunction with cataract surgery, in pseudophakic and phakic eyes, and after trauma, scleral buckle [4], laser trabeculoplasty [5], or failed trabeculectomy or tube shunt [6,7]. Contraindications Contraindications are few but the most common is pathology that limits gonioscopic view of the angle (active neovascular glaucoma, uveitis, corneal edema etc). Setup Patient’s head is rotated 30 degrees away from the surgeon and the microscope rotated 30 degrees toward the surgeon to provide optimal surgical approach. Preoperative Workup The patient’s glaucoma stage and type are identified. History taking should involve asking patients about trauma and prior eye surgeries. A complete ophthalmic examination is performed, including intraocular pressure and assessment of the angles under gonioscopy. Nerve OCTs and Humphrey visual fields are also obtained. No bloodwork, EKG, or imaging are required. Anesthesia questionnaire is completed prior to the procedure. Anatomy and Landmark Trabecular meshwork should be identified as the pigmented line between Schwalbe’s line and the scleral spur. Care must be taken to not ablate the ciliary body band. Blood reflux from Schelmm’s canal collector channels to confirm the ablation target can be induced by burping the main incision. After ablation, the cleft should be verified. The pigmented line from the trabecular meshwork should no longer be visible and only the outer wall of Schlemm’s canal seen. Advantages/Disadvantages Numerous studies have looked at the efficacy of trabectome surgery. Intraocular pressure drops to the mid-teens and decreasing the number of medications in most cases [8]. Unlike trabeculectomy or tube shunts, there is little scarring, the conjunctiva is preserved, the recovery is predictable, and there are less complications [3]. Patients with higher IOPs stand to benefit with greater reductions in IOPs than those with lower IOPs. There is limited data on the long-term success rate of trabectome surgeries. Studies following patients after surgery show that trabectome alone has a 70% success rate at 1 year but only 22% at 2 years [9,10,11]. Complications/Risks The most common complications are transient hyphema, peripheral anterior synechiae, corneal injury, and transient IOP spikes of 10 mmHg or higher. Surgical failure can be due to incomplete or improper removal of the trabecular meshwork as well as damage to the ciliary body band or surrounding tissues [12]. The rate of serious vision-threatening complications, such as hypotony, cyclodialysis cleft, choroidal hemorrhage, and endophthalmitis, is <1% [13].

ENDOSCOPIC CARTILAGE MYRINGOPLASTY
video

This video demonstrates the use of the endoscope in cartilage myringoplasty. DOI# http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/gz02921q1s

leadership (5)

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Anand R. Kumar, MD, FACS, FAAP
leadership

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Associate Professor, Departments of Plastic Surgery and Pediatrics

Anand R. Kumar, MD, FACS, FAAP is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Plastic Surgery and Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A pediatric plastic/craniofacial surgeon and basic science researcher, he conducts investigation into the cellular biology of muscle derived progenitor cells as a source of pathologic heterotopic ossification and for novel regenerative medicine applications. His clinical practice focuses on craniofacial surgery including craniosynostosis, correction of hypertelorism(wide eyes), pediatric and adolescent facial skeletal deformities (Pierre Robin Sequence) with airway obstruction using traditional orthognathic (jaw) surgery and distraction osteogenesis.

Dr. Kumar established the center for facial skeletal surgery and the center for pediatric craniofacial surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and now at Johns Hopkins respectively with an emphasis on multidisciplinary care for dentofacial anomalies. He has led efforts to improve outcomes in pediatric sleep apnea using skeletal surgery and distraction osteogenesis for multilevel airway obstruction. In addition, he has participated in multi-institutional trials for improvement of clinical outcomes in neonatal tongue base collapse (Pierre-Robin Sequence).

Dr. Kumar as authored over 30 original scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to multiple plastic and orthopedic surgery textbooks over the last 10 years. He serves as a reviewer for many plastic surgery and basic science journals and has been invited as a speaker or panelist to many institutions and at organizational meetings across the United States. He currently serves as Vice President of Communications on the board of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (ASMS). In addition, he serves on multiple committees in the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the ASMS.

As an honor student in the biological sciences at the University of California, Irvine, Dr. Kumar received his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed his general surgery residency at the Mayo Clinic Rochester and later completed a second residency in plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He subsequently completed a pediatric plastic/craniofacial surgery fellowship after his residency at UCLA. In 2004, prior to his academic appointment, Dr. Kumar volunteered for military service and joined the United States Navy until 2010. In Bethesda, MD, he served as director and staff pediatric plastic surgeon of the Military Craniofacial Unit at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. He served as division chief in plastic and reconstructive surgery at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda and on board the United States Naval Support Hospital Ship Comfort. In 2010, Dr. Kumar was recruited to the University of Pittsburgh as the director of facial skeletal surgery until 2013 when he was recruited to Johns Hopkins.

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Matthew Wade, MD
leadership

University of California, Irvine
  • Department of Ophthalmology
  • University of California, Irvine
  • Gavin Herbert Eye Institute

Dr. Matthew Wade is a fellowship-trained eye surgeon who specializes in LASIK vision correction, complex cataract surgery and cornea transplantation at the Gavin Herbert Eye Institute. Dr. Wade earned his medical degree from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C. He completed his residency in general ophthalmology at UC Irvine, where he also completed a fellowship in cornea, anterior segment and refractive surgery.

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Mitul Mehta, MD
leadership

University of California, Irvine
  • Clinical Assistant Professor
  • Department of Ophthalmology, Retina Division
  • University of California, Irvine
  • Gavin Herbert Eye Institute

Dr. Mitul C. Mehta, completed his undergraduate degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and received a Masters of Science in Physiology & Biophysics from Georgetown University. He earned his medical degree from the Keck School of Medicine of USC in Los Angeles. After completing his ophthalmology residency at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Cincinnati, Ohio, he completed fellowship training in vitreoretinal surgery at the New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in New York City.

In addition to the care of patients with vitreoretinal disorders, Mehta teaches medical students, residents and fellows. He also does research on surgical devices and techniques, as well as on vitreoretinal diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. His surgical interests include retinal detachment repair, ocular trauma, secondary lens placement, epiretinal membranes, macular holes, and surgery for endophthalmitis (severe eye infections).

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Danny Chu, MD, PhD
leadership

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Director of Cardiac Surgery, Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System
  • Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Heart and Vascular Institute

Dr. Chu received his undergraduate degree from the California Institute of Technology and his M.D. degree from the Tufts University School of Medicine. He completed general surgery residency at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Dr. Chu has authored over 70 peer-reviewed articles, 50 abstracts, 4 book chapters, and 4 invited editorials during his career thus far. He currently serves as an editorial board member of 13 peer-review journals and has been an invited reviewer of over 20 other journals. He has also been elected membership to the prestigious Society of University Surgeons. Currently, he is the Director of Cardiac Surgery at the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System and an Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Heart and Vascular Institute.

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Neil Tanna, MD, MBA, FACS
leadership

Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine
  • Associate Program Director of Plastic Surgery
  • Northwell Health
  • Associate Professor of Plastic Surgery
  • Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine

Dr. Neil Tanna is a Double Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with clinical interest in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. He is among a very small group of Plastic Surgeons in the world to have completed formal training in Otolaryngology, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, and Microvascular Surgery.

After receiving his medical degree from Albany Medical College, Dr. Tanna completed a full Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery residency at The George Washington University. He pursued further training and completed a second full residency in Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He then completed a fellowship in advanced reconstructive and microvascular surgery at the Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at New York University (NYU).

Beyond his plastic surgery clinical practice, Dr. Neil Tanna is a mentor, respected educator, and prolific author. Currently, he serves in many leadership roles. He is Chief of Plastic Surgery at one of the one of the Northwell Health hospitals. He is an Associate Professor with the Hofstra University School of Medicine, where he is engaged in the education of students. He also serves as Associate Program Director for the Plastic Surgery Residency with Northwell Health System. He trains resident physicians in becoming Plastic Surgeons.

The medical work and clinical research of Dr. Neil Tanna have been widely published in national and international medical journals. He has authored over 75 publications in major peer-reviewed medical journals and written over 10 textbook chapters. Given his interest in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery of the head and neck, breast, and body, Dr. Tanna has been invited to present at over 75 national and international meetings. He presents the latest advances in plastic surgery to his colleagues and other surgeons from all around the world.

Dr. Neil Tanna has been recognized in the 2015 and 2016 New York Times Super Doctors List for his noteworthy and outstanding achievements.

webinar (6)

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A Discussion About Removal of Intraocular Foreign Bodies
webinar

Attendees will learn about the proper procedure to follow when removing foreign bodies from the eye by discussing the process with three expert Vitreoretinal Surgeons.


Mitul Mehta, MD, MS

Fellowship Director of Vitreoretinal Surgery / Health Sciences Clinical Associate Professor

Gavin Herbert Eye Institute / University of California, Irvine

Mitul Mehta MD MS, is a board-certified ophthalmologist with fellowship training in medical and surgical diseases of the retina. He sees patients at the UCI Medical Center in Orange, CA and the Gavin Herbert Eye Institute in Irvine, CA. Dr. Mehta graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), he then completed a Master of Science degree in Physiology & Biophysics at Georgetown University and earned his MD degree from the University of Southern California (USC). After completing his ophthalmology residency at the University of Cincinnati, he graduated from fellowship training in vitreoretinal surgery at the New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai. Dr. Mehta cares for patients with vitreoretinal disorders as the Vitreoretinal Surgery Fellowship Director. He teaches medical students, residents, and fellows, and does research in surgical devices, techniques and vitreoretinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration.


C. Kiersten Pollard, MD

Vitreoretinal Surgeon

The Retina Center of Western Colorado

Dr. Pollard completed her undergraduate education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she then went on to earn her MD at the University of Colorado School of Medicine where she also completed her intern year in internal medicine. She completed her Ophthalmology residency at the University of Arizona and her vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. Pollard practices at The Retina Center of Western Colorado where she and her partners provide advanced medical and surgical vitreoretinal care to the people of western Colorado, eastern Utah, and southern Wyoming.


Hemang K. Pandya, MD FACS

Vitreoretinal Specialist / President

Dallas Retina Center / American Retina Forum

Dr. Pandya earned his M.D., with Alpha Omega Alpha honors, from the Chicago Medical School. Dr. Pandya completed his Ophthalmology training at the Kresge Eye Institute. Thereafter, Dr. Pandya completed a 2-year fellowship in Vitreoretinal Surgery at the Dean McGee Eye Institute. Dr Pandya practices at Dallas Retina Center and can be reached at DrPandya@DallasRetina.com.

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Advanced Salivary Endoscopy: Challenging Cases Diagnosis & Treatment
webinar

The advanced course will assume a basic understanding of the procedure. It will include complex interventions including endoscopic and combined open (transoral and external procedures), complications and management of complications, approach to revision surgery, in-office procedures, advanced radiology, and will include case studies.

Meet the Course Directors!

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD

Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery

University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, earned his doctoral degree from the University of Mumbai. After graduating in 1998, he completed a residency in Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery at the TN Medical College & BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, India, with triple honors. Subsequently, he completed two head neck surgery fellowships, and trained at at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, which is India's most prestigious cancer institute. After completing an Advanced Head Neck Oncologic Surgery fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, he became an Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center, prior to joining the LSU Health Sciences Center in July 2008. His clinical interests are head neck surgery and salivary endoscopy. His research interests include evaluating prognostic markers and clinical outcomes of head and neck cancer therapy and treatment of salivary gland disorders.


Barry M Schaitkin, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology

UPMC Pittsburgh

Dr. Schaitkin specializes in the treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic conditions of the salivary glands. He practices at UPMC in the Department of Otolaryngology and is affiliated with UPMC branches all across the city of Pittsburgh. He completed his medical degree and residency at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.


Meet the Presenters!


Jolie Chang, MD

Associate Professor, Chief of Sleep Surgery and General Otolaryngology

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Chang specializes in sleep apnea surgery and minimally invasive approaches to the salivary duct with sialendoscopy. She has interest in studying patient reported outcomes after sialendoscopy procedures.


Mark Marzouk, MD

Clinical Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SUNY Upstate Medical University

Dr. Marzouk completed his residency training in 2010 from the UPMC Department of Otolaryngology. He is currently the Division Chief of Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery in Syracuse. He is also the Associate Program Director of Residency Programs.


David W. Eisele, MD. FACS

Andelot Professor and Director - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Eisele is the Past-President of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery and a member of the NCCN Head and Neck Cancer Panel. He has served as a member of the Residency Review Committee for Otolaryngology, as Chair of the Advisory Council for Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery for the American College of Surgeons, President of the American Head and Neck Society, and as Vice-President of the Triological Society. He served as President of the Maryland Society of Otolaryngology and is a former Governor of the American College of Surgeons.


M. Boyd Gillespie, MD, MSc, FACS

Professor and Chair

UTHSC Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

M. Boyd Gillespie is Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he a completed residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Dr. Gillespie earned a Masters in Clinical Research at the Medical University of South Carolina, and is board certified in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Sleep Medicine. He has published over 150 academic papers and is editor of the textbook Gland-Preserving Salivary Surgery: A Problem-Based Approach. He is a former Director of the American Board of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (ABOHNS) and current member of the otolaryngology section of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).


M. Allison Ogden, MD FACS

Professor & Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations - Department of Otolaryngology

Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Ogden is a Professor and Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University School of Medicine. She graduated from the Washington University School of Medicine in 2002 and went on to complete her residency there as well in Otolaryngology in 2007. Her clinical interests include sialendoscopy, nasal obstructions, and hearling loss. In 2015 Dr. Ogden was listed in "Best Doctors in America", an honor that continues to this day.


Arjun S. Joshi, MD

Professor of Surgery

The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences

Arjun Joshi, MD is board-certified in Otolaryngology and Head & Neck surgery by both the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Joshi received his medical degree from the State University of New York at Syracuse and completed his residency at The George Washington University Medical Center. His areas of expertise include: Head and Neck Cancer, Head and Neck Masses, Head and Neck Reconstruction, Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, and Salivary Endoscopy.


Henry T. Hoffman, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology / Professor of Radiation Oncology

University of Iowa Healthcare

Dr. Henry T. Hoffman is an ENT-otolaryngologist in Iowa City, Iowa and is affiliated with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He received his medical degree from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.


David M. Cognetti, MD, FACS

Professor and Chair of Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Cognetti received his BS in Biology from Georgetown University and his MD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University before completing a fellowship in Advanced Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  Dr. Cognetti returned to Jefferson, his professional home, as faculty in 2008.


Christopher H. Rassekh, MD, FACS

Professor in Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery / Director of Penn Medicine Sialendoscopy Program

University of Pennsylvania

Christopher H. Rassekh, MD is Professor of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Penn Medicine. He is the Director of the Penn Medicine Sialendoscopy Program, which provides evaluation of and minimally invasive surgery for diseases that cause swelling of the salivary glands including obstructive diseases such as salivary stones, salivary duct strictures and tumors. Dr. Rassekh sees patients with head and neck tumors including cancers of the mouth, throat, voice box, salivary gland, thyroid and neck and also was a very early adopter of Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) for tumors and salivary gland diseases, and is an expert in cranial base surgery. He also is co-chair of the Airway Safety Committee at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.


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Alveolar Bone Graft Surgery: Tips and Tricks
webinar

This webinar will focus on the surgical management of alveolar clefts with bone grafting and fistula closure. Our panel of experts will share various techniques and graft source materials including tips and tricks learned along the way. Our guest moderator will lead a panel discussion at the end of the session to discuss some of the controversies and key points in alveolar grafting.

Dr. Larry Hartzell
Director of Cleft Lip and Palate / Pediatric ENT Surgeon @ Arkansas Children's Hospital / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Dr. Steven Goudy
Professor / Director of Division of Otolaryngology @ Emory University School of Medicine / Children's Healthcare in Atlanta
Larry Hartzell, MD FAAP is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is the Director of the Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship. Dr Hartzell also has been the Cleft Team Director in Arkansas since 2012. He is passionate about international humanitarian mission work and dedicates much of his research efforts to cleft surgical and clinical care as well as velopharyngeal insufficiency. Dr Hartzell is actively involved in multiple academic societies and organizations including the AAO-HNS and ACPA.Dr. Goudy is a professor at Emory University School of Medicine and the director of the division of otolaryngology at Children’s Healthcare in Atlanta. Dr. Goudy’s clinical job involves repair of craniofacial malformations including cleft lip, cleft palate, and Pierre Robin sequence, and he also participates in head and neck tumor resection and reconstruction.
Travis T. Tollefson MD MPH FACS
Professor & Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
@ University of California Davis
Mark E. Engelstad DDS, MD, MHI
Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ Oregon Health & Science University
Dr. Tollefson is a Professor and Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at the University of California Davis, where he specializes in cleft and pediatric craniofacial care, facial reconstruction and facial trauma care. His interest in the emerging field of Global Surgery and improving surgical access in low-resource countries led him to complete an MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health. He helps lead the CMF arm of the AO-Alliance.org, whose goal is to instill AO principles in facial injuries in low resource settings. His current research focuses on clinical outcomes of patients with cleft lip-palate, facial trauma education in Africa, patterns of mandible fracture care, and patient reported outcomes in facial paralysis surgeries. He serves on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, American Academy of Facial Plastic Surgery, and is the Editor-In-Chief for Facial Plastic Surgery and Aesthetic Medicine journal.Mark Engelstad is Associate Professor and Program Director of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon. His clinical practice focuses on the correction of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities, especially orthognathic surgery and alveolar bone grafting.
John K. Jones, MD, DMD
Associate Professor in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’ Hospital
David Joey Chang, DMD, FACS
Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery @ Tufts University/Tufts Medical Center
Dr. Jones has over 30 years of experience in the surgical management of cleft lip and palate with particular experience in the area of alveolar ridge grafting and corrective jaw surgery. He has been a member of the Cleft Lip and Palate Team at Arkansas Children’s Hospital for the last six years. During that time he has worked with Dr. Hartzell and his team to introduce and innovate new techniques, many from the realm of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dentistry, in the interest of improving outcomes for this most challenging patient population.Dr. Chang is an associate professor at Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center. Dr. Chang is involved in the Cleft Team at Tufts Medical center since 2012. He also focuses on advanced bone grafting procedures, TMJ surgery, and nerve reconstruction.

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The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly: Awake Vocal Fold Injections
webinar

In the first installation of CSurgeries’ series on laryngology, join this interactive webinar with Dr. Julina Ongkasuwan, associate professor of adult and pediatric laryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. Vyvy Young, associate professor and the associate residency program director of otolaryngology-head and neck Surgery at the University of California – San Francisco, as they walk us through a videos on an awake vocal fold injection procedure. Drs Ongkasuwan and Young will share this video and will provide detailed commentary on their approach.

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Three Stage Management of the Single Ventricle
webinar

In this session our team of experts will discuss the three stages of single ventricle palliation including the Norwood procedure, the bidirectional Glenn shunt and the Fontan procedure.  Included in this webinar will be single ventricle pathophysiology, diagnostic studies/imaging, indications and contraindications for palliation, timing of surgical intervention, and overview of surgical goals and associated mortality.


Lawrence Greiten, MD
Sophia Tyrer, Pre-Med

Assistant Professor in Division of Congenital Cardiac Surgery
Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS)

Lawrence Greiten, M.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Congenital Cardiac Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). Dr. Greiten received his undergraduate degree from Kansas Wesleyan University and his medical degree from the University Of Arizona College Of Medicine. He completed both his General Surgery training and Cardiovascular and General Thoracic Surgery fellowship at the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, where he also earned a Masters in Biomedical Sciences, Clinical and Translational Science. He did an advanced Fellowship in Congenital Cardiac Surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck Medical School at the University of Southern California.

Research Intern
Arkansas Children’s Research Institution / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Sophia is a Pre-Medical Track student that recently graduated with a traditional BA-Biology degree and a minor in Medical Humanities. She is always seeking to expand her knowledge and gain exposure to pediatric research in hopes of bettering herself as an aspiring physician and continuing research in the future.

Christian M Eisenring, ACNP-BC
Brian Reemtsen, M.D.

CVOR Surgical Assistant Chief
Arkansas Children's Hospital

Over 28 years of adult and congenital heart surgery experience. I have helped develop a minimally invasive and robotic surgery program at UCLA. In addition, I have been involved with Ex-Vivo heart and lung preservation trials and several drug trials.

Professor, Department of Surgery / Director, Heart Institute
UAMS College of Medicine / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Brian Reemtsen, M.D. is a Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in the Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is also Director of the Heart Institute at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), and his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed his internship and residency at UCLA School of Medicine. He then completed fellowships at the University of Washington, as well as the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, England.

Dr. Dala Zakaria

Pediatric Cardiologist
Arkansas Children's Hospital

After completion of her formal training, Dala Zakaria, M.D., joined the faculty of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in 2013, practicing at Arkansas Children’s. Her primary clinical interests are transesophageal and fetal echocardiography, and advanced imaging, including 3D. Dr. Zakaria performs and interprets transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms in our outpatient, inpatient and telemedicine programs. She is an integral part of the Fetal Echocardiography program, providing fetal echocardiogram interpretation and consultation.

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Ventricular Septal Defects
webinar

As one of the most common congenital cardiac anomalies managed by pediatric cardiac teams, VSD’s often may present a challenge in optimal management.  Our team of experts will discuss pathophysiology, diagnostic studies, indications and timing of surgery, surgical management; along with the technical challenges/considerations of repairing each of the different anatomic variants of ventricular septal defects: perimembranous, conoventricular, supracristal (subpulmonary), inlet (atrioventricular canal type), and muscular.


Lawrence Greiten, MD
Sophia Tyrer, Pre-Med

Assistant Professor in Division of Congenital Cardiac Surgery
Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS)

Lawrence Greiten, M.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Congenital Cardiac Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). Dr. Greiten received his undergraduate degree from Kansas Wesleyan University and his medical degree from the University Of Arizona College Of Medicine. He completed both his General Surgery training and Cardiovascular and General Thoracic Surgery fellowship at the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, where he also earned a Masters in Biomedical Sciences, Clinical and Translational Science. He did an advanced Fellowship in Congenital Cardiac Surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck Medical School at the University of Southern California.

Research Intern
Arkansas Children’s Research Institution / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Sophia is a Pre-Medical Track student that recently graduated with a traditional BA-Biology degree and a minor in Medical Humanities. She is always seeking to expand her knowledge and gain exposure to pediatric research in hopes of bettering herself as an aspiring physician and continuing research in the future.

Christian M Eisenring, ACNP-BC
Brian Reemtsen, M.D.

CVOR Surgical Assistant Chief
Arkansas Children's Hospital

Over 28 years of adult and congenital heart surgery experience. I have helped develop a minimally invasive and robotic surgery program at UCLA. In addition, I have been involved with Ex-Vivo heart and lung preservation trials and several drug trials.

Professor, Department of Surgery / Director, Heart Institute
UAMS College of Medicine / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Brian Reemtsen, M.D. is a Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in the Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He is also Director of the Heart Institute at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), and his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed his internship and residency at UCLA School of Medicine. He then completed fellowships at the University of Washington, as well as the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, England.

Shae A. Merves, MD
Josh Daily, MD, MEd

Assistant Professor, Pediatric Cardiology & Radiology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Dr. Merves is a pediatric cardiologist with a specific interest and additional training in cardiac imaging. In clinical practice, she cares for patients across all age ranges from fetal life through adulthood and performs and interprets fetal echocardiograms, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms, cardiac MRIs and cardiac CTs. She has an interest in imaging related research and education.

Pediatric Cardiologist / Associate Professor of Pediatrics / Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program Director
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Dr. Daily is a non-invasive pediatric cardiologist who serves as the Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program Director at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. His interests include echocardiography, adult education, and physician personal finance.

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Facebook Live: Fighting Physician Burnout: 8 Practices To Train For The Inevitable Bout
news

On August 30th, 2018 we were honored to have Jeff Smith, MD host a Facebook Live event. Mr. Smith is an Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon who also assists other Surgeons to develop the critical skills needed to create a highly successful lifestyle-friendly practice which is physically, mentally and emotionally sustainable. Mr. Smith joins us to share his signature methodology “The 8 Practices of Highly Successful Surgeons” that he developed based on his own 21 years at University of California San Diego.

Mr. Smith is also a Surgeon Coach and Consultant at SurgeonsMasters, a medical education company delivering strategies and techniques overlooked and underemphasized in traditional medical training. The goal of SurgonsMasters is to focus on learning, understanding and implementing effective habits that will allow all healthcare professionals to create a thriving practice while still having time to travel, connect with family and pursue outside interests.

->Watch the video recording here<-

Mr. Smith’s Live Event covers the following topics

– The Definition and Test of Burnout

– Burnout Rates in Healthcare

– Our Perception and Awareness of Burnout

– 8 Practices of Highly Successful Surgeons

– Tips for Medical Students

– Key Take Aways

– Audience Questions & Answers

The Definition of Burnout

The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI)

o “Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment that can occur among individuals who work with people in some capacity.”

o Find your specific MBI Test Here (https://www.mindgarden.com/117-maslach-burnout-inventory)

Burnout Rates in Healthcare

Our Healthcare culture or system is contributing to 80-90% of our burnout because of inefficiencies or stresses and frustrations imposed on us. However, there are aspects we can control with a proactive approach to train ourselves for facing burnout opposition in the ring.

– 20-30% experience burnout, but potentially more as there is less self awareness about the issue.

– High functioning organisations and departments with a physician leader who is very engaged and effective tend to have lower incidents of burnout among the physicians working under them. Ineffective leaders may be a contributing source of burnout among team members.

– Recent implementation of electronic medical records, other significant changes to the system can add stress to the environment, increasing burnout of those in the organization.

– 48% of women experience burnout vs. 38% of men. Rates increase to 50% between professionals aged 45 and 54 years old.

– Mr. Smith experienced burnout 5 years into his career and again around 50 years old. Even at those times, he was high functioning, busy and successful with his patient care as a surgeon. However, he was less efficient which is a cause of burnout.

Our Perception and Awareness of Burnout

– When surveyed, 40-60% of respondents report experiencing burnout.

– When presented with burnout statistics, we tend to hone in on our specialty in comparison to the others. But we shouldn’t care if our specialty experiences 40% vs 50% burnout when a high functioning specialty should be in the 20% range. There is a lot we can do to improve burnout rates across all specialties in healthcare.

– Burnout creates chaos and synergy. Often as physicians and healthcare administrators we help each other to win the fight. But we also tend to fight alone in our corner or even against each other, increasing stresses that lead to burnout.

– Higher rates of burnout on your team contribute to higher turnover, higher incidences of malpractice, medical errors, decreased patient safety and lost revenue.

– Our experience is not left in the clinic, hospital or research lab. It impacts other areas in our life, we take it with us which impacts our relationships, causes irritability, anxiety and in some cases mental health issues or substance abuses.

– We must take proactive steps to implement habits that reinforce a sustainable practice.

8 Practices to prevent, fight and win against burnout

1. Passion for performance

2. Reciprocity of roles & relationships

3. Attitude resilience

4. Community with mutual understanding

5. Time/life management using rhythm

6. Inspiring other to share goals

7. Complex problem solving through simplicity

8. Energy for personal & practice wellness

Tips for Medical Students

– Learn these practices early in your career, create and reinforce good habits.

– Implement these 8 practices with a regular effort

– Advance other areas other than just medical knowledge or surgery skills

– Improving communication or using simplicity to solve complex problems will help create a wider set of skills needed for a sustainable career in healthcare

– Be mindful of these practices even when you’ll intensely have to learn about one subject

– The key is being proactive and reflecting on how you did implement these practices

– Use constructive positive criticism to keep yourself engaged and accountable

Key Take-Aways

1. Reflection is Key

2. Planning & Setting Goals

3. Incremental Adjustments to Improve; “How can I do it better?”

Questions & Answer

How do we integrate others in implementing the 8 practices?

– Implementing the practices involves the Rs: Reciprocity, Roles and Relationships

– Although we can work on developing these practices on our own, in reality the 8 practices are integrated with those around you and on your team.

– Reach out to others to get feedback about your communication and time/life management.

– Ask how they perceive your quality time and how they can contribute towards improving your preventative burnout practices.

Do you have any tips for avoiding burnout during the last couple of weeks before exam?

– Start to learn healthy eating habits with a difficult schedules and odd rotations

– Start to learn sleep RECOVERY habits for those late nights studying, on rotations, and so on

– Find a way to get regular exercise, even if not your ideal form or quantity. Learning how to do it anyways is really helpful for the future

– Take the opportunity to reflect on what you’re doing. Over a series of exams, review the strategies you found effective and repeat them, making incremental adjustments to keep that success going.

– Allow a small physical recharge, a mental recharge or rest by taking mini breaks.

– Have the ability to support your connections, address people and stay positive!

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Meet our Presenters for Day 2!
news

The International Adult Airway Symposium is coming up this weekend! For more information view the itinerary or register here!

Dr. Vyvy Young

Associate Professor and the Associate Residency Program Director in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

University of California – San Francisco

VyVy Young, MD, is an Associate Professor and the Associate Residency Program Director in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California – San Francisco. Dr. Young received her undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Louisville, in Louisville, Kentucky, where she also pursued her Otolaryngology training. She then completed a fellowship in Laryngology and Care of the Professional Voice at the University of Pittsburgh Voice Center. She currently serves the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery as member of the Annual Meeting Program Committee and Executive Committee for ENThealth.org. She is immediate past-chair of the Voice Committee and the Women in Otolaryngology Communications Committee and was recently selected as chair of the Finance and Audit Committee of the American Broncho-Esophagological Association.


Justin Roe, PhD, FRCSLT

Clinical Service Lead - Speech and Language Therapy – National Centre for Airway Reconstruction

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

Dr. Roe is a clinical-academic and service lead, specialising in dysphagia in benign and malignant head and neck disease. He leads the speech and language therapy service for the National Centre for Airway Reconstruction at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and is a consultant and service lead at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. He is an Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer at Imperial College London and an investigator on a number of NIHR portfolio studies. He is currently on an NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre/ Imperial Health Charity funded post-doctoral research fellowship. He is an elected council member for the British Laryngological Association and British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists.


Professor Anil Patel MBBS PhD FRCA

Clinical Anaesthetist / Chairman of Department of Anaesthesia

Royal National ENT & Eastman Dental Hospital

Professor Anil Patel graduated from University College London in 1991. He is a clinical anaesthetist and continues to develop and refine the largest experience of anaesthetising adult airway patients under general anaesthesia (> 6,000 procedures) in the UK, probably Europe and possibly the world. His research interests include all aspects of shared airway and difficult airway management. Professor Patel has been an invited speaker to over 300 national and international meetings in 38 countries. He has over 130+ peer reviewed publications, 25 book chapters, over 4,500 citations and an h-index of 25.


Robbi A. Kupfer, MD

Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

University of Michigan

Dr. Kupfer is an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan who specializes in Laryngology and Bronchoesophagology. She is the Program Director for the Laryngology Fellowship as well as the Otolaryngology Residency at the University of Michigan.


Alexander T. Hillel, MD, FACS

Associate Professor

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Alexander Hillel is a Laryngologist, Residency Program Director, and Vice Director of Education in the Johns Hopkins Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery. His clinical practice and research centers on the treatment, prevention, and causes of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS).


Dale Ekbom, MD

Associate Professor of Otolaryngology / Director of Voice Disorders/Laryngology

Mayo Clinic

Residency in Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan with a fellowship in Laryngology/Care of the Professional Voice at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Clinically specializing in voice, especially management of vocal fold paralysis, Zenker’s diverticulum and Cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction, early laryngeal cancer, and airway compromise due to laryngeal, subglottic, and tracheal stenosis. Research interests include idiopathic subglottic stenosis and GPA with surgical and medical management of the airway, vocal fold paralysis, new injectables using Jellyfish collagen.


Dr. Ricky Thakrar

Consultant Chest Physician

University College London Hospital

Dr. Ricky Thakrar qualified in Medicine from Imperial College London. He trained in Respiratory Medicine at the Royal Brompton Hospital and completed his training in Northwest London. He was appointed to a three-year academic fellowship at UCL where his PhD examined state of the art bronchoscopy techniques for managing cancers arising in central airways and lung. He is a Consultant in Thoracic Medicine and his main interests are in interventional bronchoscopy procedures (laser resection, airway stenting, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and brachytherapy) for pre-malignant and malignant disease of the tracheobronchial tree.


Dr. Michael Rutter

Director of the Aerodigestive Center

Cincinnati Children's Hospital

Dr. Rutter is an ENT surgeon specializing in pediatric otolaryngology with an emphasis on airway problems in children, adolescents and young adults. His interests include tracheal reconstruction and complex airway surgery. Always a problem-solver, he strives to involve the patient in their own care by having them help evaluate the issue and then craft a solution together. He was drawn to his career by the challenge and highly individualized nature of pediatric airway problems and management. Dr. Rutter enjoys working in a multidisciplinary team setting and focusing on coordinated care for complex childhood airway conditions. He was honored to receive the 2016 Gabriel Frederick Tucker Award from the American Laryngological Association, and the 2018 Sylvan Stool Teaching Award from the Society for Ear Nose and Throat Advancement in Children (SENTAC). These awards are for his contributions to the field of pediatric laryngology. In addition to caring for patients, he is also dedicated to his research trying to find improvements in airway management.


Christopher T. Wootten, MD, MMHC

Director, Pediatric Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Wootten has a longstanding interest in surgical management of congenital and acquired airway disorders.  To better equip himself to lead the Pediatric ENT service through expansion, evolution of practice models, and differentiation into multidisciplinary care, Dr. Wootten obtained a Masters of Management in Health Care at Vanderbilt’s Owen School of Business in 2017.  Areas of his professional research emphasis include airway obstruction in children and adults and aerodigestive care. He innovates minimally invasive surgical techniques in the head and neck.  Dr. Wootten is actively investigating the role of eosinophil and mast cell-based inflammation in the pediatric larynx.


Karla O'Dell, M.D.

Assistant Professor / Co-director

USC Voice Center, Caruso Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery @ University of Southern California / USC Center for Airway Intervention and Reconstruction

Karla O’Dell, MD, specializes in head and neck surgery and disorders of the voice, airway and swallowing. She is cofounder and codirector of the USC Airway Intervention & Reconstruction Center (USC Air Center).


Jeanne L. Hatcher, MD, FACS

Co-Director of the Emory Voice Center and Associate Professor of Otolaryngology

Emory University School of Medicine

Dr. Hatcher has been at Emory since 2014 after completing her laryngology fellowship with Dr. Blake Simpson; she specializes in open and endoscopic airway surgery as well as voice disorders. Dr. Hatcher is a member of the ABEA and post-graduate member of the ALA and also serves on the Ethics and Voice Committees for the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.


Mr. Lee Aspland

Patient / Freelance Artist

Lee Aspland Photography

Lee Aspland is a photographer, author and mindful practitioner who creates photography that reflects his feelings about living in such a glorious world. He specializes in Mindful Photography, capturing a fleeting feeling or thought, a hope or fear, a frozen single moment in time.


Gemma Clunie, MSc, BA (Hon), MRCSLT

Clinical Specialist Speech-Language Pathologist (Airways/ENT) and HEE/NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust/ Imperial College London, Department of Surgery & Cancer

Gemma is a Clinical Specialist Speech and Language Therapist with an interest in voice and swallowing disorders that is particularly focused on the benign ENT, head and neck, respiratory and critical care populations. Gemma is a current NIHR/HEE Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow at Imperial College London. Her PhD studies focus on the voice and swallowing difficulties of airway stenosis patients. She is based at Charing Cross Hospital in London where she has worked for the last six years as part of the National Centre for Airway Reconstruction, Europe’s largest centre for the management of airway disorders.


Niall C. Anderson, CPsychol, MSc, BSc

Lead Psychologist (formerly Respiratory Highly Specialist Health Psychologist)

Bart's Health NHS Trust (formerly Central & North West London NHS Foundation Trust)

Niall is a HCPC Registered & BPS Chartered Practitioner Health Psychologist, and BPS RAPPS Registered Supervisor. Niall has specialist experience of working within healthcare systems with people with long-term health conditions at all system levels to support physical, psychological and social wellbeing. Niall worked in the Airway Service at Charing Cross Hospital (London, UK) between January-December 2021 in order to develop and implement the Airway Psychology Service.


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Introducing a Two-Part Sialendoscopy Series!
news

Brought to you by our partnership with Cook Medical, we are having a two-part series on Sialendoscopy. The sessions will feed into one another, the first covering basics like a review of instrumentation and set up, as well as some of the most basic interventions you will see.

The second session will assume a basic knowledge of the procedure and will deal with complex interventions including both endoscopic and combined open procedures, advanced radiology, and complication management for revision surgery and in-office procedures.

Meet the Course Directors!

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD

Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery

University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center

Rohan R. Walvekar, MD, earned his doctoral degree from the University of Mumbai. After graduating in 1998, he completed a residency in Otolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery at the TN Medical College & BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, India, with triple honors. Subsequently, he completed two head neck surgery fellowships, and trained at at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, which is India's most prestigious cancer institute. After completing an Advanced Head Neck Oncologic Surgery fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, he became an Assistant Professor in Head Neck Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh/VA Medical Center, prior to joining the LSU Health Sciences Center in July 2008. His clinical interests are head neck surgery and salivary endoscopy. His research interests include evaluating prognostic markers and clinical outcomes of head and neck cancer therapy and treatment of salivary gland disorders.


Barry M Schaitkin, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology

UPMC Pittsburgh

Dr. Schaitkin specializes in the treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic conditions of the salivary glands. He practices at UPMC in the Department of Otolaryngology and is affiliated with UPMC branches all across the city of Pittsburgh. He completed his medical degree and residency at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.


Meet the Presenters!


Jolie Chang, MD

Associate Professor, Chief of Sleep Surgery and General Otolaryngology

University of California, San Francisco

Dr. Chang specializes in sleep apnea surgery and minimally invasive approaches to the salivary duct with sialendoscopy. She has interest in studying patient reported outcomes after sialendoscopy procedures.


Mark Marzouk, MD

Clinical Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SUNY Upstate Medical University

Dr. Marzouk completed his residency training in 2010 from the UPMC Department of Otolaryngology. He is currently the Division Chief of Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery in Syracuse. He is also the Associate Program Director of Residency Programs.


David W. Eisele, MD. FACS

Andelot Professor and Director - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Eisele is the Past-President of the American Board of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery and a member of the NCCN Head and Neck Cancer Panel. He has served as a member of the Residency Review Committee for Otolaryngology, as Chair of the Advisory Council for Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery for the American College of Surgeons, President of the American Head and Neck Society, and as Vice-President of the Triological Society. He served as President of the Maryland Society of Otolaryngology and is a former Governor of the American College of Surgeons.


M. Boyd Gillespie, MD, MSc, FACS

Professor and Chair

UTHSC Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

M. Boyd Gillespie is Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he a completed residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Dr. Gillespie earned a Masters in Clinical Research at the Medical University of South Carolina, and is board certified in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Sleep Medicine. He has published over 150 academic papers and is editor of the textbook Gland-Preserving Salivary Surgery: A Problem-Based Approach. He is a former Director of the American Board of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (ABOHNS) and current member of the otolaryngology section of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).


M. Allison Ogden, MD FACS

Professor & Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations - Department of Otolaryngology

Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Ogden is a Professor and Vice-Chair of Clinical Operations in the Department of Otolaryngology at Washington University School of Medicine. She graduated from the Washington University School of Medicine in 2002 and went on to complete her residency there as well in Otolaryngology in 2007. Her clinical interests include sialendoscopy, nasal obstructions, and hearling loss. In 2015 Dr. Ogden was listed in "Best Doctors in America", an honor that continues to this day.


Arjun S. Joshi, MD

Professor of Surgery

The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences

Arjun Joshi, MD is board-certified in Otolaryngology and Head & Neck surgery by both the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Joshi received his medical degree from the State University of New York at Syracuse and completed his residency at The George Washington University Medical Center. His areas of expertise include: Head and Neck Cancer, Head and Neck Masses, Head and Neck Reconstruction, Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, and Salivary Endoscopy.


Henry T. Hoffman, MD

Professor of Otolaryngology / Professor of Radiation Oncology

University of Iowa Healthcare

Dr. Henry T. Hoffman is an ENT-otolaryngologist in Iowa City, Iowa and is affiliated with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He received his medical degree from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.


David M. Cognetti, MD, FACS

Professor and Chair of Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Cognetti received his BS in Biology from Georgetown University and his MD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University before completing a fellowship in Advanced Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Cognetti returned to Jefferson, his professional home, as faculty in 2008.


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