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We found 7 results for University of Southern California in webinar, video & leadership

webinar (2)

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Pediatric Endoscopic Airway Surgery
webinar

This webinar will address common and advanced pediatric airway pathology. There will be a focus on video demonstration of advanced surgical endoscopic management of pediatric airway pathology ranging from laryngomalacia to type 3 laryngeal clefts.

Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Associate Professor @New York Presbyterian Hospital- Weill Cornell Medical Center

Vikash K. Modi, MD, is an Associate Professor and the Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery at New York Presbyterian Hospital- Weill Cornell Medical Center. After receiving his medical degree from the Rutgers Medical School, Dr. Modi completed his residency in Otolaryngology at the University of Southern California - Keck School of Medicine. Following residency, Dr. Modi completed a Pediatric Otolaryngology fellowship at Northwestern University - Children's Memorial Hospital. He founded the Cornell Aerodigestive Center and has one of the largest series of endoscopic posterior cricoid split with rib grafting (presented at ESPO). He also has presented his work on endoscopic repair of laryngeal clefts at ASPO and CEORL. He has been inducted as a Fellow, into the prestigious Triological Society for his thesis paper on airway balloon dilation and currently serves as a Section Editor-Video Editor of The Laryngoscope and is known for his surgical endoscopic airway videos.

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Battle of the Medialization Techniques: Michael “Type 1 Thyroplasty” Johns vs. Julina “Reinnervation” Ongkasuwan
webinar

In the next installation of CSurgeries’ series on laryngology, join this interactive webinar with Dr. Julina Ongkasuwan, associate professor of adult and pediatric laryngology at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. Michael Johns, Director, USC Voice Center and Professor, Caruso Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery – University of Southern California, for a discussion of permanent medialization techniques. Type 1 thyroplasty vs Reinnervation.

Which one will you choose and when?

video (4)

Awake Steroid Injection for Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis
video

Contributor: Michael Johns III, MD This video demonstrates a steroid injection in an awake patient for the treatment of idiopathic subglottic stenosis. The patient is first anesthetized with topical 2% lidocaine over the larynx and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine percutaneously over the cricoid cartilage. An endoscope is passed transnasally and positioned just below the vocal folds. A 23 gauge needle is then passed through the cricothyroid membrane, and Kenalog is circumferentially injected submucosally taking care not to reduce the caliber size of the airway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/htvmbepobg

Treatment of Adult Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis with CO2 Laser and Balloon Dilation
video

Contributors: Michael M. Johns III and Benjamin Anthony The patient is a 53 year-old female with history of idiopathic subglottic stenosis and long-standing right vocal fold scarring who had previously been treated endoscopically in the operating room and in the office with steroid injections. She returns to the operating room for scheduled endoscopic CO2 laser treatment, Depo-Medrol injection (not shown), balloon dilation, and Mitomycin C application (not shown). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/p7s4gn9n20 Editor Recruited By: Michael M. Johns, III, MD

EMG Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
video

Contributors: Christian Lava, Hagit Shoffel-havakuk, and Michael M Johns Iii Adductor spasmodic dysphonia is the most common form of laryngeal dystonia, causing inappropriate glottic closure and strangled choppy voice. This video demonstrates step by step, the standard treatment for adductor spasmodic dysphonia: bilateral, EMG-guided, percutaneous botulinum toxin injections to the TA-LCA (thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid) muscles.

Retroseptal Transconjunctival Approach to Orbital Floor Blowout Fracture
video

The transconjunctival approach was first described by Bourquet in 1924 and then modified by Tessier in 1973 for exposure of the orbital floor and maxilla for the treatment of facial trauma. This approach can be carried out either in a preseptal plane by separating the orbital septum from within the eyelid (preseptal approach) or posterior to the septum and eyelid (retroseptal approach) by making an incision through the bulbar conjunctiva directly above the orbital rim. The main advantage of the retroseptal approach is that it does not involve dissection and disruption of the eyelid itself, therefore, reducing the incidence of post-operative lid laxity and position abnormalities. This video will show a retroseptal approach to an orbital floor blowout fracture. A lateral inferior cantholysis is performed to facilitate eversion and retraction of the lower eyelid.

leadership (1)

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Nahyoung Grace Lee, MD
leadership

Harvard Medical School
  • Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Grace Lee, M.D. is an ophthalmologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear (MEE) with a rigorous clinical practice in ophthalmic plastic surgery.  Approximately 80% of her time is devoted to patient care, which is integrated with teaching residents and fellows in the clinic and surgical setting.  This component also includes direct instruction in the wet lab and weekly supervision in the MEE emergency room.  Twenty percent of Dr. Lee‘s time is spent doing clinical and basic science research.Dr. Lee completed her BA of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University followed by a doctorate in Medicine. Upon completing her ophthalmology residency at the University of Southern California, she pursued a fellowship in ocular oncology and pathology at the Casey Eye Institute, at the Oregon Health & Science University. She directly taught residents in the pathology lab as well as through over 15 hours of didactic lectures. Her additional training involved three years of fellowship in oculoplastic surgery at MEE, where she was the recipient of the Fellow of the Year teaching award.  During this fellowship, Dr. Lee collaborated with Dr. Leo Kim to produce an animal model of orbital inflammation and investigated angiogenesis in thyroid eye disease, which was published in Ophthalmology. At the culmination of her training, she was inducted into the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons (ASOPRS) and is now Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School (HMS).Dr. Lee‘s clinical expertise and innovations have focused on thyroid eye disease and common conditions in ophthalmic plastic surgery.  She has expanded her clinical practice to involve anterior segment tumors, building on her fellowship in ocular oncology.  In the process, she has trained 4 fellows, 3 of whom have accepted or will be accepting positions at academic institutions.  Additionally, she serves as an oral board examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology.

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