Selective Stapedial tendon and Tensor Tympani tenotomy for the treatment of Middle Ear Myoclonus in a pediatric patient

Objective tinnitus is a rare phenomenon whereby a patient perceives sound in the absence of external auditory stimuli, that is also observed by the examiner. Unlike subjective tinnitus which is thought to be somatosensory and usually difficult to cure, objective tinnitus is more likely to have an identifiable cause amenable to treatment. The differential for objective tinnitus includes aberrant vascular anatomy affecting the temporal bone, patulous eustachian tube function, and abnormal myoclonic activity of the palatal or middle ear muscles.1  

We present a 16-year-old female who presented for evaluation of objective tinnitus. On physical examination, an intermittent rhythmic clicking was identified. Visualization of both the tympanic membrane and palate during active audible tinnitus was observed and found to be normal. A hearing test was performed demonstrating normal hearing and speech thresholds as well as normal tympanogram. Acoustic reflex testing demonstrated absent decay in both ears and  spontaneous discharge for the right ear in response to both high and very low stimulus indicating abnormal stapedial and tensor tympani function. MRA demonstrated normal vascular anatomy and MRI was obtained demonstrating normal anatomy without lesions of the brainstem, cochleovestibular nerves, or ear or mastoid pathology. The patients was subsequently diagnosed with isolated middle ear myocolonus (MEM). Treatment options including medical versus surgical therapy were discussed as has previously been described. The patient ultimately elected for surgical tenotomy of the stapedial and tensor tympani tendons. Using endoscopic technique, a middle ear exploration was performed. Canal injection was performed with standard tympanomeatal flap elevation was assisted with epinephrine pledgets. The Annular ligament was identified and the middle ear was entered. Additional dissections was performed superiorly, and the chorda tympani nerve was identified and preserved. The stapedial tendon was visualized emanating from the pyramidal eminence to the posterior crus of the stapes. Balluci scissors were used to sharply incise the tendon and the remaining ends were reflected using a Rosen needle to prevent re-anastamosis. Additional dissection along the malleus was performed to gain access to the tensor tympani tendon. A 30 degree angled endoscope was utilized to visualize the tensor tympani tendon extending forward from the cochleariform process to the neck of the malleus. The angled 6400 Beaver blade was used to sharply incise the tendon, requiring multiple passess due to the thickness of the tendon. The sharply incised ends of both tendons were clearly visualized. The tympanomeatal flap was re draped and secured with gel foam packing. The patient was seen in follow up three weeks post operatively with a well healed ear drum, resolution of her objective tinnitus, normal hearing, and absent stapedial reflexes. The patient and mother were happy. Endoscopic stapedial and tensor tympani tenotomy is a feasible technique for isolated MEM in the pediatric population.

Endoscopic Nd:Yag and Bleomycin Injection for the management of a Hypopharyngeal Venous Malformation

Venous malformations (VM) are congenital lesions, frequently affecting the head and neck, with poor respect for tissue planes. Established treatments include observation, sclerotherapy, laser, and surgical resection.1  

Lesions affecting the upper airways present unique challenge due to frequent unresectability and difficult access/exposure for alternative standard treatments. We describe our approach of standard endoscopic airway techniques for the administration of advanced treatment modalities including simultaneous laser and sclerotherapy for an extensive airway VM.

Our patient is a 16-year-old female with an extensive multi-spatial VM with associated airway obstruction.  The patient suffered from severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) dependence as a result of airway compression. Direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy demonstrated extensive venous staining and large vascular channels of the hypopharynx. Lumenis Nd:Yag laser (Yokneam, Israel) via 550 micron fiber was passed under telescopic visualization. Treatment via previously described “polka dot” technique was performed (15W, 0.5 pulse duration) with immediate tissue response. The largest vascular channel was accessed via 25-gauge butterfly needle. Immediate return of blood following lesion puncture confirmed intralesional placement. Reconstituted bleomycin (1 U/kg; max dose = 15 U per treatment) was injected and hemostasis achieved with afrin pledgets. The patient was intubated overnight. She was extubated the next morning and advanced to a regular diet, discharging post-operative day two. Post-operative flexible laryngoscopy demonstrated significant improvement in the treatment areas, and follow up sleep study demonstrated sleep apnea resolution with liberation of her CPAP therapy.

Branchial Cleft Cyst Excision

Branchial cleft cysts are a benign anomaly caused by incomplete obliteration of a primordial branchial cleft.  They typically appear in childhood or adolescence, but can appear at any age. They present as a non-tender, fluctuant mass following an upper respiratory infection, most commonly at the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. These lesions are thought to originate during the 4th week of gestation when the branchial arches fail to fuse. The second branchial cleft is the most common site (95%) and cysts from in this distribution can affect cranial nerves VII, IX, and XII. 

Nasal Encephalocele: Endoscopic Surgery

Contributors: Vincent Couloigner

We describe the excision of a nasal encephalocele obstructing the left nasal fossa with an anterior subcutaneous portion deforming the nasal pyramid in a four-year-old girl using endoscopic surgery combined to a Rethi approach. The anterior skull base defect was reconstructed using autologous conchal cartilage and temporal fascia.

Editor Recruited By: Sanjay Parikh, MD, FACS

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/udewjr2ge7

Microdebrider Assisted Lingual Tonsillectomy

Microdebrider Assisted Lingual Tonsillectomy

Adrian Williamson, Michael Kubala MD, Adam Johnson MD PhD, Megan Gaffey MD, and Gresham Richter MD

The lingual tonsils are a collection of lymphoid tissue found on the base of the tongue. The lingual tonsils along with the adenoid, tubal tonsils, palatine tonsils make up Waldeyer’s tonsillar ring. Hypertrophy of the lingual tonsils contributes to obstructive sleep apnea and lingual tonsillectomy can alleviate this intermittent airway obstruction.1,2 Lingual tonsil hypertrophy can manifest more rarely with chronic infection or dysphagia. A lingual tonsil grading system has been purposed by Friedman et al 2015, which rates lingual tonsils between grade 0 and grade 4. Friedman et al define grade 0 as absent lingual tonsils and grade 4 lingual tonsils as lymphoid tissue covering the entire base of tongue and rising above the tip of the epiglottis in thickness.3

Lingual tonsillectomy has been approached by a variety of different surgical techniques including electrocautery, CO2 laser, cold ablation (coblation) and microdebridement.4-9 Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has also been used to improve exposure of the tongue base to perform lingual tonsillectomy.10-13 At this time, there is not enough evidence to support that one of these techniques is superior.

Here, we describe the microdebrider assisted lingual tonsillectomy in an 8 year-old female with Down Syndrome. This patient was following in Arkansas Children’s Sleep Disorders Center and found to have persistent moderate obstructive sleep apnea despite previous adenoidectomy and palatine tonsillectomy. Unfortunately, she did not tolerate her continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. The patient underwent polysomnography 2 months preoperatively which revealed an oxygen saturation nadir of 90%, an apnea-hypopnea index of 7.7, and an arousal index of 16.9. There was no evidence of central sleep apnea. The patient was referred to otolaryngology to evaluate for possible surgical management.

Given the severity of the patient’s symptoms and clinical appearance, a drug induced sleep state endoscopy with possible surgical intervention was planned. The drug induced sleep state endoscopy revealed grade IV lingual tonsil hypertrophy causing obstruction of the airway with collapse of the epiglottis to the posterior pharyngeal wall. A jaw thrust was found to relieve this displacement and airway obstruction. The turbinates and pharyngeal tonsils were not causing significant obstruction of the airway. At this time the decision was made to proceed with microdebrider assisted lingual tonsillectomy.

First, microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy were performed followed by orotracheal intubation using a Phillips 1 blade and a 0 degree Hopkins rod. Surgical exposure was achieved using suspension laryngoscopy with the Lindholm laryngoscope and the 0 degree Hopkins rod. 1% lidocaine with epinephrine is injected into the base of tongue for hemostatic control using a laryngeal needle under the guidance of the 0 degree Hopkins rod. 1.     The 4 mm Tricut Sinus Microdebrider blade was set to 5000 RPM and inserted between the laryngoscope and the lips to resect the lingual tonsils. Oxymetazoline-soaked pledgets were used periodically during resection to maintain hemostasis and proper visualization. A subtotal lingual tonsillectomy was completed with preservation of the fascia overlying the musculature at the base of tongue.

She was extubated following surgery and there were no postoperative complications. Four months after postoperatively the patient followed up at Arkansas Children’s Sleep Disorders Center and was found to have notable clinical improvement especially with her daytime symptoms. A postoperative polysomnography was not performed given the patient’s clinical improvement.

Endoscopic Posterior Cricoid Split with Rib Grafting for Bilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

Endoscopic posterior cricoid split with rib grafting can be used in children with bilateral vocal fold immobility due to bilateral vocal fold paralysis or cricoarytenoid joint fixation with posterior glottic stenosis. It is preferred to vocal cordotomy/arytenoidectomy because it is a non-destructive procedure with no impact on voice and swallowing.  It is also preferred to open laryngotracheal reconstruction because it does not disrupt the anterior cricoid ring thereby preserving the “spring” of the cricoid.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17797/gcnyoduseo

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